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Single-center experience with intraoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in lung transplantation


Cosgun, Tugba; Tomaszek, Sandra; Opitz, Isabelle; Wilhelm, Markus; Schuurmans, Macé M; Weder, Walter; Inci, Ilhan (2018). Single-center experience with intraoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in lung transplantation. The International Journal of Artificial Organs, 41(2):89-93.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that survival after lung transplantation is impaired if extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support is implemented. We investigated the outcome and potential independent risk factors on survival in recipients undergoing lung transplantation with intraoperative ECMO support.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of recipients were retrospectively evaluated (January 2000-December 2014). Retransplantation and bridge to transplantation on ECMO were excluded. Recipients (n = 291) were divided into 2 groups: those who needed intraoperative ECMO support (Group 1, n = 134) and those who did not receive intraoperative ECMO support (Group 2, n = 157). Independent risk factors were identified by a stepwise backward regression analysis.
RESULTS: 1-year survival was 84.2% in Group 1 vs. 90.4% in Group 2, and 5-year survival was 52.8% in Group 1 vs. 70.5% in Group 2 (p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis indicated that recipient age (p = 0.001), renal replacement therapy (p = 0.001) and intraoperative ECMO support (p = 0.03) were significant risk factors for overall survival. The rate of postoperative early surgical complications was comparable between the two groups (p = 0.09). The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy and experiencing late pulmonary complications was significantly higher in Group 1 (p = 0.02).
CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that lung transplantation with intraoperative ECMO support is associated with poor outcomes.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that survival after lung transplantation is impaired if extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support is implemented. We investigated the outcome and potential independent risk factors on survival in recipients undergoing lung transplantation with intraoperative ECMO support.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of recipients were retrospectively evaluated (January 2000-December 2014). Retransplantation and bridge to transplantation on ECMO were excluded. Recipients (n = 291) were divided into 2 groups: those who needed intraoperative ECMO support (Group 1, n = 134) and those who did not receive intraoperative ECMO support (Group 2, n = 157). Independent risk factors were identified by a stepwise backward regression analysis.
RESULTS: 1-year survival was 84.2% in Group 1 vs. 90.4% in Group 2, and 5-year survival was 52.8% in Group 1 vs. 70.5% in Group 2 (p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis indicated that recipient age (p = 0.001), renal replacement therapy (p = 0.001) and intraoperative ECMO support (p = 0.03) were significant risk factors for overall survival. The rate of postoperative early surgical complications was comparable between the two groups (p = 0.09). The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy and experiencing late pulmonary complications was significantly higher in Group 1 (p = 0.02).
CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that lung transplantation with intraoperative ECMO support is associated with poor outcomes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Thoracic Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:23 Jan 2018 19:10
Last Modified:30 May 2018 06:43
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0391-3988
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5301/IJAO.5000645
PubMed ID:29027193

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