Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Help-negation in suicidal youth living in Switzerland


Dey, M; Jorm, A F (2017). Help-negation in suicidal youth living in Switzerland. European Journal of Psychiatry, 31(1):17-22.

Abstract

Objectives To examine whether help-negation (i.e. not accepting or accessing available helping resources) among suicidal youth could also be found in a Swiss sample. Methods Data from 7335 16–20-year olds, who participated in the 2002 Swiss Multicentre Adolescent Survey on Health, were analyzed. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict if a person would generally talk with no one when having a mental health problem (e.g. feeling depressed or anxious). Not talking about such problems was interpreted as indicator for help-negation. The main predictor was suicide severity. Additionally, an indicator of depression and socio-demographic variables were included in the statistical models. Results People with higher levels of suicidality and depression were more likely to report that they would not talk about mental health problems. More non-Swiss (vs. Swiss) participants and apprentices (vs. students) reported high suicidality. Furthermore, these specific sub-groups seemed to be particularly likely to negate help. Conclusion Help-negation can also be found in a Swiss sample of young people and seems to be particularly pronounced in some socio-demographic subgroups. By reducing this reluctance to seek help, premature death due to suicide might be reduced.

Abstract

Objectives To examine whether help-negation (i.e. not accepting or accessing available helping resources) among suicidal youth could also be found in a Swiss sample. Methods Data from 7335 16–20-year olds, who participated in the 2002 Swiss Multicentre Adolescent Survey on Health, were analyzed. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict if a person would generally talk with no one when having a mental health problem (e.g. feeling depressed or anxious). Not talking about such problems was interpreted as indicator for help-negation. The main predictor was suicide severity. Additionally, an indicator of depression and socio-demographic variables were included in the statistical models. Results People with higher levels of suicidality and depression were more likely to report that they would not talk about mental health problems. More non-Swiss (vs. Swiss) participants and apprentices (vs. students) reported high suicidality. Furthermore, these specific sub-groups seemed to be particularly likely to negate help. Conclusion Help-negation can also be found in a Swiss sample of young people and seems to be particularly pronounced in some socio-demographic subgroups. By reducing this reluctance to seek help, premature death due to suicide might be reduced.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 02 Feb 2018
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychiatry and Mental health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:02 Feb 2018 09:48
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 13:26
Publisher:Universidad de Zaragoza
ISSN:0213-6163
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpsy.2016.12.004
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDP2ZHP1_148710
  • : Project TitlePopulation Mental Health in Switzerland: Time trends in population mental health and in the utilization of health services & mental healthy literacy

Download