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Preterm birth and its impact on renal health


Luyckx, Valerie A (2017). Preterm birth and its impact on renal health. Seminars in Nephrology, 37(4):311-319.

Abstract

Preterm birth occurs in approximately 10% of all births worldwide. Preterm infants have reduced nephron numbers at birth in proportion to gestational age, and are at increased risk of neonatal acute kidney injury as well as higher blood pressure, proteinuria, and chronic kidney disease later in life. Rapid catch-up growth in preterm infants, especially if resulting in obesity, is a risk factor for end-stage kidney disease among children with proteinuric renal disease. Preterm birth, however, is a risk factor not only for the infant because mothers who deliver preterm have an increased risk of having subsequent preterm deliveries as well as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease later in life. Preterm birth in a female infant is also a risk factor for her future risk of having a preterm delivery, gestational hypertension, and gestational diabetes, which in turn may impact the development of fetal kidneys and the offspring's risk of hypertension and renal disease. This intergenerational programming cycle, therefore, perpetuates the risks and consequences of prematurity. Interruption of this cycle may be possible through optimization of maternal nutrition and health as well as careful antenatal care, which may in turn reduce the global burden of hypertension and renal disease in subsequent generations.

Abstract

Preterm birth occurs in approximately 10% of all births worldwide. Preterm infants have reduced nephron numbers at birth in proportion to gestational age, and are at increased risk of neonatal acute kidney injury as well as higher blood pressure, proteinuria, and chronic kidney disease later in life. Rapid catch-up growth in preterm infants, especially if resulting in obesity, is a risk factor for end-stage kidney disease among children with proteinuric renal disease. Preterm birth, however, is a risk factor not only for the infant because mothers who deliver preterm have an increased risk of having subsequent preterm deliveries as well as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease later in life. Preterm birth in a female infant is also a risk factor for her future risk of having a preterm delivery, gestational hypertension, and gestational diabetes, which in turn may impact the development of fetal kidneys and the offspring's risk of hypertension and renal disease. This intergenerational programming cycle, therefore, perpetuates the risks and consequences of prematurity. Interruption of this cycle may be possible through optimization of maternal nutrition and health as well as careful antenatal care, which may in turn reduce the global burden of hypertension and renal disease in subsequent generations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2017
Deposited On:23 Feb 2018 20:12
Last Modified:14 Mar 2018 17:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0270-9295
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2017.05.002
PubMed ID:28711069

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