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Quality of life after paediatric ischaemic stroke


Kornfeld, Salome; Studer, Martina; Winkelbeiner, Stephanie; Regényi, Mária; Boltshauser, Eugen; Steinlin, Maja; Swiss Neuropediatric Stroke Group (2017). Quality of life after paediatric ischaemic stroke. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 59(1):45-51.

Abstract

AIM: Paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke can lead to reduced quality of life (QoL). It is important to identify predictors of QoL to support recovery. We examined long-term QoL after arterial ischaemic stroke concerning different variables.
METHOD: Children registered in the Swiss Neuropediatric Stroke Registry and suffering from arterial ischaemic stroke between 2000 and 2008 were included. Two years post-stroke, assessments included intelligence quotient tests for cognitive impairment and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for neurological impairment; 5 years post-stroke, the Kidscreen-27 was used for QoL, DSM-IV criteria screening was used for attention deficits, and the ABILHAND-Kids was used for manual motor skills. Age at stroke, sex, socioeconomic status, lesion characteristics, neuropsychological and motor outcome, and mRS were correlated with QoL measures.
RESULTS: Seventy children were examined (49 males, 21 females; mean age 7y 2wks). Age at stroke, sex, socioeconomic status, and lesion characteristics did not influence QoL; IQ below average and attention deficits partially influenced QoL. The highest predictive value for QoL was found for manual motor impairment (p=0.002) and mRS scores (p=0.013). Combined motor, cognitive, and attention impairment negatively affected QoL (p=0.001).
INTERPRETATION: Neurological and cognitive impairments after paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke negatively influence QoL. Children with motor and neurological problems, as well as those with combined motor, cognitive, and attention problems, are at higher risk for low QoL.

Abstract

AIM: Paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke can lead to reduced quality of life (QoL). It is important to identify predictors of QoL to support recovery. We examined long-term QoL after arterial ischaemic stroke concerning different variables.
METHOD: Children registered in the Swiss Neuropediatric Stroke Registry and suffering from arterial ischaemic stroke between 2000 and 2008 were included. Two years post-stroke, assessments included intelligence quotient tests for cognitive impairment and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for neurological impairment; 5 years post-stroke, the Kidscreen-27 was used for QoL, DSM-IV criteria screening was used for attention deficits, and the ABILHAND-Kids was used for manual motor skills. Age at stroke, sex, socioeconomic status, lesion characteristics, neuropsychological and motor outcome, and mRS were correlated with QoL measures.
RESULTS: Seventy children were examined (49 males, 21 females; mean age 7y 2wks). Age at stroke, sex, socioeconomic status, and lesion characteristics did not influence QoL; IQ below average and attention deficits partially influenced QoL. The highest predictive value for QoL was found for manual motor impairment (p=0.002) and mRS scores (p=0.013). Combined motor, cognitive, and attention impairment negatively affected QoL (p=0.001).
INTERPRETATION: Neurological and cognitive impairments after paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke negatively influence QoL. Children with motor and neurological problems, as well as those with combined motor, cognitive, and attention problems, are at higher risk for low QoL.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2017
Deposited On:08 Feb 2018 10:10
Last Modified:29 Jun 2018 07:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0012-1622
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.13295
PubMed ID:27767202

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