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Evaluation of 4-oxo-quinoline-based CB2 PET radioligands in R6/2 chorea huntington mouse model and human ALS spinal cord tissue


Haider, Ahmed; Spinelli, Francesco; Herde, Adrienne Müller; Mu, Boshuai; Keller, Claudia; Margelisch, Markus; Weber, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Mu, Linjing; Ametamey, Simon M (2018). Evaluation of 4-oxo-quinoline-based CB2 PET radioligands in R6/2 chorea huntington mouse model and human ALS spinal cord tissue. European journal of medicinal chemistry, 145:746-759.

Abstract

The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) has been implicated in a series of neurodegenerative disorders and has emerged as an interesting biological target for therapeutic as well as diagnostic purposes. In the present work, we describe an improved radiosynthetic approach to obtain the previously reported CB2-specific PET radioligand [18F]RS-126 in higher radiochemical yields and molar activities. Additionally, the study revealed that prolongation of the [18F]RS-126 fluoroalkyl side chain ultimately leads to an improved stability towards mouse liver enzymes but is accompanied by a reduction in selectivity over the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Huntington-related phenotypic changes as well as striatal D2R downregulation were confirmed for the transgenic R6/2 mouse model. CB2 upregulation in R6/2 Chorea Huntington mice was observed in hippocampus, cortex, striatum and cerebellum by qPCR, however, these results could not be confirmed at the protein level by PET imaging. Furthermore, we evaluated the utility of the newly developed [11C]RS-028, a potent [18F]RS-126 derivative with increased polarity and high selectivity over CB1 in post-mortem human ALS spinal cord and control tissue. Applying in vitro autoradiography, the translational relevance of CB2 imaging was demonstrated by the specific binding of [11C]RS-028 to post-mortem human ALS spinal cord tissue.

Abstract

The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) has been implicated in a series of neurodegenerative disorders and has emerged as an interesting biological target for therapeutic as well as diagnostic purposes. In the present work, we describe an improved radiosynthetic approach to obtain the previously reported CB2-specific PET radioligand [18F]RS-126 in higher radiochemical yields and molar activities. Additionally, the study revealed that prolongation of the [18F]RS-126 fluoroalkyl side chain ultimately leads to an improved stability towards mouse liver enzymes but is accompanied by a reduction in selectivity over the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Huntington-related phenotypic changes as well as striatal D2R downregulation were confirmed for the transgenic R6/2 mouse model. CB2 upregulation in R6/2 Chorea Huntington mice was observed in hippocampus, cortex, striatum and cerebellum by qPCR, however, these results could not be confirmed at the protein level by PET imaging. Furthermore, we evaluated the utility of the newly developed [11C]RS-028, a potent [18F]RS-126 derivative with increased polarity and high selectivity over CB1 in post-mortem human ALS spinal cord and control tissue. Applying in vitro autoradiography, the translational relevance of CB2 imaging was demonstrated by the specific binding of [11C]RS-028 to post-mortem human ALS spinal cord tissue.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Organic Chemistry, Pharmacology, Drug Discovery, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:5 January 2018
Deposited On:09 Feb 2018 14:45
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 13:55
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0223-5234
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmech.2017.12.097
PubMed ID:29353725

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