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Off-the-shelf tissue engineered heart valves for in situ regeneration: current state, challenges and future directions


Motta, Sarah E; Lintas, Valentina; Fioretta, Emanuela S; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Emmert, Maximilian Y (2018). Off-the-shelf tissue engineered heart valves for in situ regeneration: current state, challenges and future directions. Expert Review of Medical Devices, 15(1):35-45.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is continuously evolving and is expected to surpass surgical valve implantation in the near future. Combining durable valve substitutes with minimally invasive implantation techniques might increase the clinical relevance of this therapeutic option for younger patient populations. Tissue engineering offers the possibility to create tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) with regenerative and self-repair capacities which may overcome the pitfalls of current TAVR prostheses. Areas covered: This review focuses on off-the-shelf TEHVs which rely on a clinically-relevant in situ tissue engineering approach and which have already advanced into preclinical or first-in-human investigation. Expert commentary: Among the off-the-shelf in situ TEHVs reported in literature, the vast majority covers pulmonary valve substitutes, and only few are combined with transcatheter implantation technologies. Hence, further innovations should include the development of transcatheter tissue engineered aortic valve substitutes, which would considerably increase the clinical relevance of such prostheses.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is continuously evolving and is expected to surpass surgical valve implantation in the near future. Combining durable valve substitutes with minimally invasive implantation techniques might increase the clinical relevance of this therapeutic option for younger patient populations. Tissue engineering offers the possibility to create tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) with regenerative and self-repair capacities which may overcome the pitfalls of current TAVR prostheses. Areas covered: This review focuses on off-the-shelf TEHVs which rely on a clinically-relevant in situ tissue engineering approach and which have already advanced into preclinical or first-in-human investigation. Expert commentary: Among the off-the-shelf in situ TEHVs reported in literature, the vast majority covers pulmonary valve substitutes, and only few are combined with transcatheter implantation technologies. Hence, further innovations should include the development of transcatheter tissue engineered aortic valve substitutes, which would considerably increase the clinical relevance of such prostheses.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:in situ tissue engineering , , off-the-shelf, , remodeling, , tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV), , transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR)
Language:English
Date:January 2018
Deposited On:15 Feb 2018 08:49
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 13:59
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1743-4440
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17434440.2018.1419865
PubMed ID:29257706
Project Information:
  • : FunderH2020
  • : Grant ID750104
  • : Project TitleRESOURCE - Groundwater quality assessment in areas with intensive livestock: is manure recycling a major source of pollution and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes?â��
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID604514
  • : Project TitleIMAVALVE - Intelligent materials for in-situ heart Valve tissue engineering

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