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Plasma Potassium Determines NCC Abundance in Adult Kidney-SpecificγENaC Knockout


Boscardin, Emilie; Perrier, Romain; Sergi, Chloé; Maillard, Marc P; Loffing, Johannes; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Koesters, Robert; Rossier, Bernard C; Hummler, Edith (2018). Plasma Potassium Determines NCC Abundance in Adult Kidney-SpecificγENaC Knockout. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN):Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) are key regulators of sodium and potassium and colocalize in the late distal convoluted tubule of the kidney. Loss of the αENaC subunit leads to a perinatal lethal phenotype characterized by sodium loss and hyperkalemia resembling the human syndrome pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-I). In adulthood, inducible nephron-specific deletion of αENaC in mice mimics the lethal phenotype observed in neonates, and as in humans, this phenotype is prevented by a high sodium (HNa+)/low potassium (LK+) rescue diet. Rescue reflects activation of NCC, which is suppressed at baseline by elevated plasma potassium concentration. In this study, we investigated the role of the γENaC subunit in the PHA-I phenotype. Nephron-specific γENaC knockout mice also presented with salt-wasting syndrome and severe hyperkalemia. Unlike mice lacking αENaC or βΕΝaC, an HNa+/LK+ diet did not normalize plasma potassium (K+) concentration or increase NCC activation. However, when K+ was eliminated from the diet at the time that γENaC was deleted, plasma K+ concentration and NCC activity remained normal, and progressive weight loss was prevented. Loss of the late distal convoluted tubule, as well as overall reduced βENaC subunit expression, may be responsible for the more severe hyperkalemia. We conclude that plasma K+ concentration becomes the determining and limiting factor in regulating NCC activity, regardless of Na+ balance in γENaC-deficient mice.

Abstract

The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) are key regulators of sodium and potassium and colocalize in the late distal convoluted tubule of the kidney. Loss of the αENaC subunit leads to a perinatal lethal phenotype characterized by sodium loss and hyperkalemia resembling the human syndrome pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-I). In adulthood, inducible nephron-specific deletion of αENaC in mice mimics the lethal phenotype observed in neonates, and as in humans, this phenotype is prevented by a high sodium (HNa+)/low potassium (LK+) rescue diet. Rescue reflects activation of NCC, which is suppressed at baseline by elevated plasma potassium concentration. In this study, we investigated the role of the γENaC subunit in the PHA-I phenotype. Nephron-specific γENaC knockout mice also presented with salt-wasting syndrome and severe hyperkalemia. Unlike mice lacking αENaC or βΕΝaC, an HNa+/LK+ diet did not normalize plasma potassium (K+) concentration or increase NCC activation. However, when K+ was eliminated from the diet at the time that γENaC was deleted, plasma K+ concentration and NCC activity remained normal, and progressive weight loss was prevented. Loss of the late distal convoluted tubule, as well as overall reduced βENaC subunit expression, may be responsible for the more severe hyperkalemia. We conclude that plasma K+ concentration becomes the determining and limiting factor in regulating NCC activity, regardless of Na+ balance in γENaC-deficient mice.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:25 January 2018
Deposited On:15 Feb 2018 13:49
Last Modified:25 Mar 2018 05:40
Publisher:American Society of Nephrology
ISSN:1046-6673
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2017030345

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