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Variables decreasing tip movement of peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric patients


Gnannt, Ralph; Connolly, Bairbre L; Parra, Dimitri A; Amaral, Joao; Moineddin, Rahim; Thakor, Avnesh S (2016). Variables decreasing tip movement of peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric patients. Pediatric Radiology, 46(11):1532-1538.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The position of the tip of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is crucial; malposition can lead to malfunction of the line or life-threatening events (e.g., arrhythmias, perforation). OBJECTIVE To determine what factors other than arm position and accessed vein might influence the tip position of a PICC. MATERIALS AND METHODS Inclusion criteria were upper limb PICC placement, body weight <20 kg, intraoperative imaging with the arm in 0°, 45° and 90° abduction and an arm view marking the skin entry site relative to the shoulder. Evaluated variables included patient demographics, and PICC and insertion site characteristics. We measured central tip movement in rib units. RESULTS We included 112 children who received a PICC (42 girls/70 boys, mean age 31±13 months, mean weight 6.5±4.9 kg). The overall range of central tip movement was -1 to +4 rib units (mean +0.8±0.7 rib units). Silicone PICCs moved significantly less than polyurethane PICCs (P<0.05). PICCs placed in the cephalic vein moved significantly less than those placed in other veins (P<0.05). Patient demographics and PICC characteristics (size, number of lumens, left or right arm accessed, length of the line) did not influence the range of central tip movement of a PICC (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Silicone PICCs and PICCs inserted into the cephalic vein move less than PICCs made of polyurethane and PICCs inserted into the brachial and basilic veins. These findings might assist operators in deciding which PICC to place in children in a given clinical context.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The position of the tip of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is crucial; malposition can lead to malfunction of the line or life-threatening events (e.g., arrhythmias, perforation). OBJECTIVE To determine what factors other than arm position and accessed vein might influence the tip position of a PICC. MATERIALS AND METHODS Inclusion criteria were upper limb PICC placement, body weight <20 kg, intraoperative imaging with the arm in 0°, 45° and 90° abduction and an arm view marking the skin entry site relative to the shoulder. Evaluated variables included patient demographics, and PICC and insertion site characteristics. We measured central tip movement in rib units. RESULTS We included 112 children who received a PICC (42 girls/70 boys, mean age 31±13 months, mean weight 6.5±4.9 kg). The overall range of central tip movement was -1 to +4 rib units (mean +0.8±0.7 rib units). Silicone PICCs moved significantly less than polyurethane PICCs (P<0.05). PICCs placed in the cephalic vein moved significantly less than those placed in other veins (P<0.05). Patient demographics and PICC characteristics (size, number of lumens, left or right arm accessed, length of the line) did not influence the range of central tip movement of a PICC (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Silicone PICCs and PICCs inserted into the cephalic vein move less than PICCs made of polyurethane and PICCs inserted into the brachial and basilic veins. These findings might assist operators in deciding which PICC to place in children in a given clinical context.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2016
Deposited On:06 Feb 2018 13:30
Last Modified:13 Apr 2018 11:35
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0301-0449
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00247-016-3648-1
PubMed ID:27272928

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