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Posthumanist panic cinema: defining a genre


Loren, Scott (2012). Posthumanist panic cinema: defining a genre. In: Straub, Julia. Paradoxes of authenticity : studies on a critical concept. Bielefeld: De Gruyter, 159-183.

Abstract

Mainstream American cinema around the turn of the twenty-first century was prolific in producing a specific representation of the individual in crisis: a human subject beset by an onslaught of forces alien to itself. The regularity with which this type of figure appeared in popular cinema was both a result of and contributed to practices of collective representation. Implicit in the assumption that popular narrative provide insight into the cultures that produce and circulate them is the concomitant assumption that identities and subjectivities are inseparable from stories cultures tell about themselves, and that upon closer examination, these stories will always tell something more about historical selves. Following this logic, popular cinematic representations can be treated as cultural artefacts that both form collective representations and reflect “collective preoccupations,” as Renée Hoogland has put it (213). Who, then, was this set-upon figure in popular cinema of recent decades, and what can his collective representation tell us about the ideas and sentiments Durkheim proposes as indicators of cultural concerns?

Abstract

Mainstream American cinema around the turn of the twenty-first century was prolific in producing a specific representation of the individual in crisis: a human subject beset by an onslaught of forces alien to itself. The regularity with which this type of figure appeared in popular cinema was both a result of and contributed to practices of collective representation. Implicit in the assumption that popular narrative provide insight into the cultures that produce and circulate them is the concomitant assumption that identities and subjectivities are inseparable from stories cultures tell about themselves, and that upon closer examination, these stories will always tell something more about historical selves. Following this logic, popular cinematic representations can be treated as cultural artefacts that both form collective representations and reflect “collective preoccupations,” as Renée Hoogland has put it (213). Who, then, was this set-upon figure in popular cinema of recent decades, and what can his collective representation tell us about the ideas and sentiments Durkheim proposes as indicators of cultural concerns?

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > English Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:820 English & Old English literatures
Uncontrolled Keywords:authenticity, cinema, conspiracy, essentialism, posthuman, posthumanism, science fiction
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:11 Sep 2018 10:09
Last Modified:14 May 2019 15:24
Publisher:De Gruyter
Series Name:Kultur- und Medientheorie
ISBN:9783839418192
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.14361/transcript.9783839418192.159
Related URLs:https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/250816/ (Organisation)
https://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=ebi01_prod009644668&context=L&vid=ZAD&search_scope=default_scope&isFrbr=true&tab=default_tab&lang=de_DE (Library Catalogue)

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