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Gitelman syndrome: consensus and guidance from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference


Blanchard, Anne; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Bolignano, Davide; Calò, Lorenzo A; Cosyns, Etienne; Devuyst, Olivier; Ellison, David H; Karet Frankl, Fiona E; Knoers, Nine V.A.M; Konrad, Martin; Lin, Shih-Hua; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa (2017). Gitelman syndrome: consensus and guidance from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference. Kidney International, 91(1):24-33.

Abstract

Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a rare, salt-losing tubulopathy characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The disease is recessively inherited, caused by inactivating mutations in the SLC12A3 gene that encodes the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC). GS is usually detected during adolescence or adulthood, either fortuitously or in association with mild or nonspecific symptoms or both. The disease is characterized by high phenotypic variability and a significant reduction in the quality of life, and it may be associated with severe manifestations. GS is usually managed by a liberal salt intake together with oral magnesium and potassium supplements. A general problem in rare diseases is the lack of high quality evidence to inform diagnosis, prognosis, and management. We report here on the current state of knowledge related to the diagnostic evaluation, follow-up, management, and treatment of GS; identify knowledge gaps; and propose a research agenda to substantiate a number of issues related to GS. This expert consensus statement aims to establish an initial framework to enable clinical auditing and thus improve quality control of care.

Abstract

Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a rare, salt-losing tubulopathy characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The disease is recessively inherited, caused by inactivating mutations in the SLC12A3 gene that encodes the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC). GS is usually detected during adolescence or adulthood, either fortuitously or in association with mild or nonspecific symptoms or both. The disease is characterized by high phenotypic variability and a significant reduction in the quality of life, and it may be associated with severe manifestations. GS is usually managed by a liberal salt intake together with oral magnesium and potassium supplements. A general problem in rare diseases is the lack of high quality evidence to inform diagnosis, prognosis, and management. We report here on the current state of knowledge related to the diagnostic evaluation, follow-up, management, and treatment of GS; identify knowledge gaps; and propose a research agenda to substantiate a number of issues related to GS. This expert consensus statement aims to establish an initial framework to enable clinical auditing and thus improve quality control of care.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:20 Feb 2018 15:44
Last Modified:14 Mar 2018 17:51
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0085-2538
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2016.09.046
PubMed ID:28003083

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