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Root avoidance of toxic metals requires the GeBP-LIKE 4 transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana


Khare, Deepa; Mitsuda, Nobukata; Lee, Seungchul; Song, Won-Yong; Hwang, Daehee; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook; Hwang, Jae-Ung (2017). Root avoidance of toxic metals requires the GeBP-LIKE 4 transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. New Phytologist, 213(3):1257-1273.

Abstract

Plants reorganize their root architecture to avoid growth into unfavorable regions of the rhizosphere. In a screen based on chimeric repressor gene-silencing technology, we identified the Arabidopsis thaliana GeBP-LIKE 4 (GPL4) transcription factor as an inhibitor of root growth that is induced rapidly in root tips in response to cadmium (Cd). We tested the hypothesis that GPL4 functions in the root avoidance of Cd by analyzing root proliferation in split medium, in which only half of the medium contained toxic concentrations of Cd. The wild-type (WT) plants exhibited root avoidance by inhibiting root growth in the Cd side but increasing root biomass in the control side. By contrast, GPL4-suppression lines exhibited nearly comparable root growth in the Cd and control sides and accumulated more Cd in the shoots than did the WT. GPL4 suppression also altered the root avoidance of toxic concentrations of other essential metals, modulated the expression of many genes related to oxidative stress, and consistently decreased reactive oxygen species concentrations. We suggest that GPL4 inhibits the growth of roots exposed to toxic metals by modulating reactive oxygen species concentrations, thereby allowing roots to colonize noncontaminated regions of the rhizosphere.

Abstract

Plants reorganize their root architecture to avoid growth into unfavorable regions of the rhizosphere. In a screen based on chimeric repressor gene-silencing technology, we identified the Arabidopsis thaliana GeBP-LIKE 4 (GPL4) transcription factor as an inhibitor of root growth that is induced rapidly in root tips in response to cadmium (Cd). We tested the hypothesis that GPL4 functions in the root avoidance of Cd by analyzing root proliferation in split medium, in which only half of the medium contained toxic concentrations of Cd. The wild-type (WT) plants exhibited root avoidance by inhibiting root growth in the Cd side but increasing root biomass in the control side. By contrast, GPL4-suppression lines exhibited nearly comparable root growth in the Cd and control sides and accumulated more Cd in the shoots than did the WT. GPL4 suppression also altered the root avoidance of toxic concentrations of other essential metals, modulated the expression of many genes related to oxidative stress, and consistently decreased reactive oxygen species concentrations. We suggest that GPL4 inhibits the growth of roots exposed to toxic metals by modulating reactive oxygen species concentrations, thereby allowing roots to colonize noncontaminated regions of the rhizosphere.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Plant Science, Physiology
Date:February 2017
Deposited On:26 Feb 2018 15:58
Last Modified:23 Sep 2018 06:14
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0028-646X
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14242
PubMed ID:27768815

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