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Low emotion-oriented coping and informal help-seeking behaviour as major predictive factors for improvement in major depression at 5-year follow-up in the adult community


Rodgers, S; Vandeleur, C L; Strippoli, M-P F; Castelao, E; Tesic, A; Glaus, J; Lasserre, A M; Müller, M; Rössler, W; Ajdacic-Gross, V; Preisig, M (2017). Low emotion-oriented coping and informal help-seeking behaviour as major predictive factors for improvement in major depression at 5-year follow-up in the adult community. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 52(9):1169-1182.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Given the broad range of biopsychosocial difficulties resulting from major depressive disorder (MDD), reliable evidence for predictors of improved mental health is essential, particularly from unbiased prospective community samples. Consequently, a broad spectrum of potential clinical and non-clinical predictors of improved mental health, defined as an absence of current major depressive episode (MDE) at follow-up, were examined over a 5-year period in an adult community sample.
METHODS: The longitudinal population-based PsyCoLaus study from the city of Lausanne, Switzerland, was used. Subjects having a lifetime MDD with a current MDE at baseline assessment were selected, resulting in a subsample of 210 subjects. Logistic regressions were applied to the data.
RESULTS: Coping styles were the most important predictive factors in the present study. More specifically, low emotion-oriented coping and informal help-seeking behaviour at baseline were associated with the absence of an MDD diagnosis at follow-up. Surprisingly, neither formal help-seeking behaviour, nor psychopharmacological treatment, nor childhood adversities, nor depression subtypes turned out to be relevant predictors in the current study.
CONCLUSIONS: The paramount role of coping styles as predictors of improvement in depression found in the present study might be a valuable target for resource-oriented therapeutic models. On the one hand, the positive impact of low emotion-oriented coping highlights the utility of clinical interventions interrupting excessive mental ruminations during MDE. On the other hand, the importance of informal social networks raises questions regarding how to enlarge the personal network of affected subjects and on how to best support informal caregivers.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Given the broad range of biopsychosocial difficulties resulting from major depressive disorder (MDD), reliable evidence for predictors of improved mental health is essential, particularly from unbiased prospective community samples. Consequently, a broad spectrum of potential clinical and non-clinical predictors of improved mental health, defined as an absence of current major depressive episode (MDE) at follow-up, were examined over a 5-year period in an adult community sample.
METHODS: The longitudinal population-based PsyCoLaus study from the city of Lausanne, Switzerland, was used. Subjects having a lifetime MDD with a current MDE at baseline assessment were selected, resulting in a subsample of 210 subjects. Logistic regressions were applied to the data.
RESULTS: Coping styles were the most important predictive factors in the present study. More specifically, low emotion-oriented coping and informal help-seeking behaviour at baseline were associated with the absence of an MDD diagnosis at follow-up. Surprisingly, neither formal help-seeking behaviour, nor psychopharmacological treatment, nor childhood adversities, nor depression subtypes turned out to be relevant predictors in the current study.
CONCLUSIONS: The paramount role of coping styles as predictors of improvement in depression found in the present study might be a valuable target for resource-oriented therapeutic models. On the one hand, the positive impact of low emotion-oriented coping highlights the utility of clinical interventions interrupting excessive mental ruminations during MDE. On the other hand, the importance of informal social networks raises questions regarding how to enlarge the personal network of affected subjects and on how to best support informal caregivers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:27 Feb 2018 18:39
Last Modified:14 Mar 2018 17:59
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0933-7954
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-017-1421-x
PubMed ID:28748306

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