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Amotosalen/ultraviolet A pathogen inactivation technology reduces platelet activatability, induces apoptosis and accelerates clearance


Stivala, Simona; Gobbato, Sara; Infanti, Laura; Reiner, Martin F; Bonetti, Nicole; Meyer, Sara C; Camici, Giovanni G; Lüscher, Thomas F; Buser, Andreas; Beer, Jürg H (2017). Amotosalen/ultraviolet A pathogen inactivation technology reduces platelet activatability, induces apoptosis and accelerates clearance. Haematologica, 102(10):1650-1660.

Abstract

Amotosalen and ultraviolet A (UVA) photochemical-based pathogen reduction using the Intercept™ Blood System (IBS) is an effective and established technology for platelet and plasma components, which is adopted in more than 40 countries worldwide. Several reports point towards a reduced platelet function after Amotosalen/UVA exposure. The study herein was undertaken to identify the mechanisms responsible for the early impairment of platelet function by the IBS. Twenty-five platelet apheresis units were collected from healthy volunteers following standard procedures and split into 2 components, 1 untreated and the other treated with Amotosalen/UVA. Platelet impedance aggregation in response to collagen and thrombin was reduced by 80% and 60%, respectively, in IBS-treated units at day 1 of storage. Glycoprotein Ib (GpIb) levels were significantly lower in IBS samples and soluble glycocalicin correspondingly augmented; furthermore, GpIbα was significantly more desialylated as shown by(ECL) binding. The pro-apoptotic Bak protein was significantly increased, as well as the MAPK p38 phosphorylation and caspase-3 cleavage. Stored IBS-treated platelets injected into immune-deficient nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice showed a faster clearance. We conclude that the IBS induces platelet p38 activation, GpIb shedding and platelet apoptosis through a caspase-dependent mechanism, thus reducing platelet function and survival. These mechanisms are of relevance in transfusion medicine, where the IBS increases patient safety at the expense of platelet function and survival.

Abstract

Amotosalen and ultraviolet A (UVA) photochemical-based pathogen reduction using the Intercept™ Blood System (IBS) is an effective and established technology for platelet and plasma components, which is adopted in more than 40 countries worldwide. Several reports point towards a reduced platelet function after Amotosalen/UVA exposure. The study herein was undertaken to identify the mechanisms responsible for the early impairment of platelet function by the IBS. Twenty-five platelet apheresis units were collected from healthy volunteers following standard procedures and split into 2 components, 1 untreated and the other treated with Amotosalen/UVA. Platelet impedance aggregation in response to collagen and thrombin was reduced by 80% and 60%, respectively, in IBS-treated units at day 1 of storage. Glycoprotein Ib (GpIb) levels were significantly lower in IBS samples and soluble glycocalicin correspondingly augmented; furthermore, GpIbα was significantly more desialylated as shown by(ECL) binding. The pro-apoptotic Bak protein was significantly increased, as well as the MAPK p38 phosphorylation and caspase-3 cleavage. Stored IBS-treated platelets injected into immune-deficient nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice showed a faster clearance. We conclude that the IBS induces platelet p38 activation, GpIb shedding and platelet apoptosis through a caspase-dependent mechanism, thus reducing platelet function and survival. These mechanisms are of relevance in transfusion medicine, where the IBS increases patient safety at the expense of platelet function and survival.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2017
Deposited On:26 Feb 2018 22:14
Last Modified:14 Mar 2018 18:05
Publisher:Ferrata Storti Foundation
ISSN:0390-6078
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2017.164137
PubMed ID:28729303

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