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Collapsing contexts: social networking technologies in young people’s nightlife


Truong, Jasmine (2018). Collapsing contexts: social networking technologies in young people’s nightlife. Children's Geographies, 16(3):266-278.

Abstract

In the latest discussions of children and young people’s new geographies of leisure and pleasure, one controversial issue has been how digital technologies co-produce and reconfigure young people’s everyday worlds. This article draws on semi-structured interviews with 40 young people who regularly use social networking technologies in their nightlife experiences in Zurich and Lausanne, two nightlife hubs in Switzerland. Informed by Danah Boyd’s concepts of ‘collapsing contexts’ and ‘imagined audiences’, this article enables a critical engagement with young people’s emerging understanding of their nightlife contexts, which are increasingly permeated by networking technologies. I show how social networking spaces facilitate the coming together, or collapse, of various social contexts which induce young people to imagine multiple audiences, including authority figures, in their nightlife practices. These collapsing contexts and imagined audiences, I argue, present new perspectives on debates about control and surveillance in young people’s contemporary urban nightlife.

Abstract

In the latest discussions of children and young people’s new geographies of leisure and pleasure, one controversial issue has been how digital technologies co-produce and reconfigure young people’s everyday worlds. This article draws on semi-structured interviews with 40 young people who regularly use social networking technologies in their nightlife experiences in Zurich and Lausanne, two nightlife hubs in Switzerland. Informed by Danah Boyd’s concepts of ‘collapsing contexts’ and ‘imagined audiences’, this article enables a critical engagement with young people’s emerging understanding of their nightlife contexts, which are increasingly permeated by networking technologies. I show how social networking spaces facilitate the coming together, or collapse, of various social contexts which induce young people to imagine multiple audiences, including authority figures, in their nightlife practices. These collapsing contexts and imagined audiences, I argue, present new perspectives on debates about control and surveillance in young people’s contemporary urban nightlife.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:10 Apr 2018 12:22
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 15:24
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1473-3285
Additional Information:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Children's Geographies on 2018, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14733285.2018.1458214
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/14733285.2018.1458214
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDCR12I1_150181
  • : Project TitleYouth@Night - A multi-disciplinary multi-method study of young people's outgoing and drinking behaviors

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