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Report of a human autopsy case in maxillary sinuses augmented using a synthetic bone substitute: Micro-computed tomographic and histologic observations


Lee, Jung-Seok; Cha, Jae-Kook; Thoma, Daniel S; Jung, Ui-Won (2018). Report of a human autopsy case in maxillary sinuses augmented using a synthetic bone substitute: Micro-computed tomographic and histologic observations. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 29(3):339-345.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE This study of a human autopsy case aimed to characterize the histologic and micro-computed tomographic results of maxillary sinus augmentation using a synthetic bone substitute and simultaneous implant placement at 6 years.
MATERIAL AND METHODS This report is based on the whole-body donation of a 62-year-old male patient who died due to bladder cancer. Implants had been placed in conjunction with sinus augmentation using a mixture of biphasic calcium phosphate and autogenous bone into both maxillary sinuses 6 years prior to the body donation. The maxillary sinus areas containing implants were gently removed from the cadaver and scanned using high-resolution micro-computed tomography. Samples were sectioned, prepared for undecalcified histologic slides and stained with haematoxylin-eosin.
RESULTS The augmented volume was observed up to the apex of the implants, which were successfully osseointegrated. Cross-sectional micro-computed tomographic views revealed that the bone-substitute particles were embedded in radiopaque-mineralized tissues showing a trabecular pattern around the implants. The histologic analysis revealed mature lamellar bone surrounding the remaining bone-substitute particles as well as well-organized bone marrow spaces in the augment bone area and around the dental implants.
CONCLUSION This human autopsy study histologically confirmed the presence of successful bone formation and long-term volume stability after sinus augmentation using biphasic calcium phosphate and simultaneous implant placement.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE This study of a human autopsy case aimed to characterize the histologic and micro-computed tomographic results of maxillary sinus augmentation using a synthetic bone substitute and simultaneous implant placement at 6 years.
MATERIAL AND METHODS This report is based on the whole-body donation of a 62-year-old male patient who died due to bladder cancer. Implants had been placed in conjunction with sinus augmentation using a mixture of biphasic calcium phosphate and autogenous bone into both maxillary sinuses 6 years prior to the body donation. The maxillary sinus areas containing implants were gently removed from the cadaver and scanned using high-resolution micro-computed tomography. Samples were sectioned, prepared for undecalcified histologic slides and stained with haematoxylin-eosin.
RESULTS The augmented volume was observed up to the apex of the implants, which were successfully osseointegrated. Cross-sectional micro-computed tomographic views revealed that the bone-substitute particles were embedded in radiopaque-mineralized tissues showing a trabecular pattern around the implants. The histologic analysis revealed mature lamellar bone surrounding the remaining bone-substitute particles as well as well-organized bone marrow spaces in the augment bone area and around the dental implants.
CONCLUSION This human autopsy study histologically confirmed the presence of successful bone formation and long-term volume stability after sinus augmentation using biphasic calcium phosphate and simultaneous implant placement.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Reconstructive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2018
Deposited On:19 Apr 2018 06:41
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0905-7161
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/clr.13124
PubMed ID:29349884

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