Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evaluation of severe and fatal injuries in extreme and contact sports: an international multicenter analysis


Weber, Christian D; Horst, Klemens; Nguyen, Anthony R; Lefering, Rolf; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Hildebrand, Frank; TraumaRegister DGU (2018). Evaluation of severe and fatal injuries in extreme and contact sports: an international multicenter analysis. Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, 138(7):963-970.

Abstract

PURPOSE The participation in extreme and contact sports has grown internationally, despite the significant risk for major and multiple injuries. We conducted this multicenter study to evaluate sport-specific injury patterns and mechanisms, to characterize individuals at risk and to identify possible approaches for prevention. METHODS We compared demographic data, severity and patterns of injuries; and the pre- and in-hospital management from an international population-based prospective trauma database (TraumaRegister DGU®). The registry was screened for sport-related injuries, and only patients with major injuries [Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥ 9 points] related to extreme or contact sports activities were included (January 1, 2002, to December 31, 2012). Parameters were compared for different types of sports activities: (1) Airborne sports, (2) Climbing, (3) Skateboarding/Skating, (4) Contact sports. The following countries participated: Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Finland, Slovenia, Belgium, Luxembourg, and The Netherlands. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS (Version 22, IBM Inc., Armonk, New York). RESULTS A total of 278 athletes were identified within the study period and classified into four groups: Airborne sports (n = 105) were associated with the highest injury severity (ISS 22.4 ± 14.6), followed by climbing (n = 35, ISS 16.5 ± 12), skating (n = 67, ISS 15.2 ± 10.3) and contact sports (n = 71, ISS 10.4 ± 9.2). Especially high falls resulted in a significant rate of spinal injuries in airborne activities (68.6%, p < 0.001) and in climbing accidents (45.7%). Skating was associated with the highest rate of loss of consciousness (LOC) at scene (27.1%), the highest pre-hospital intubation rate (33.3%), and also the highest in-hospital mortality (15.2%, p < 0.001), related to major head injuries. CONCLUSIONS Extreme and contact sports related major injuries predominantly affect young male athletes. Especially skaters are at risk for debilitating and lethal head injuries. Individuals recognizing sport-specific hazards might modify their risk behavior. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Descriptive Epidemiologic Study, Level II.

Abstract

PURPOSE The participation in extreme and contact sports has grown internationally, despite the significant risk for major and multiple injuries. We conducted this multicenter study to evaluate sport-specific injury patterns and mechanisms, to characterize individuals at risk and to identify possible approaches for prevention. METHODS We compared demographic data, severity and patterns of injuries; and the pre- and in-hospital management from an international population-based prospective trauma database (TraumaRegister DGU®). The registry was screened for sport-related injuries, and only patients with major injuries [Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥ 9 points] related to extreme or contact sports activities were included (January 1, 2002, to December 31, 2012). Parameters were compared for different types of sports activities: (1) Airborne sports, (2) Climbing, (3) Skateboarding/Skating, (4) Contact sports. The following countries participated: Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Finland, Slovenia, Belgium, Luxembourg, and The Netherlands. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS (Version 22, IBM Inc., Armonk, New York). RESULTS A total of 278 athletes were identified within the study period and classified into four groups: Airborne sports (n = 105) were associated with the highest injury severity (ISS 22.4 ± 14.6), followed by climbing (n = 35, ISS 16.5 ± 12), skating (n = 67, ISS 15.2 ± 10.3) and contact sports (n = 71, ISS 10.4 ± 9.2). Especially high falls resulted in a significant rate of spinal injuries in airborne activities (68.6%, p < 0.001) and in climbing accidents (45.7%). Skating was associated with the highest rate of loss of consciousness (LOC) at scene (27.1%), the highest pre-hospital intubation rate (33.3%), and also the highest in-hospital mortality (15.2%, p < 0.001), related to major head injuries. CONCLUSIONS Extreme and contact sports related major injuries predominantly affect young male athletes. Especially skaters are at risk for debilitating and lethal head injuries. Individuals recognizing sport-specific hazards might modify their risk behavior. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Descriptive Epidemiologic Study, Level II.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Surgery, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:19 April 2018
Deposited On:26 Apr 2018 07:18
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 15:33
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0936-8051
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00402-018-2935-8
PubMed ID:29675749

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library