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Ultrasound-assisted versus conventional catheter-directed thrombolysis for acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis: 1-year follow-up data of a randomized-controlled trial


Engelberger, R P; Stuck, A; Spirk, D; Willenberg, T; Haine, A; Périard, D; Baumgartner, I; Kucher, N (2017). Ultrasound-assisted versus conventional catheter-directed thrombolysis for acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis: 1-year follow-up data of a randomized-controlled trial. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 15(7):1351-1360.

Abstract

Essentials Acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis can be treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT). We performed a randomized trial comparing conventional CDT versus ultrasound-assisted CDT (USAT). Clinical and duplex sonographic outcomes at 12 months were similar in the CDT and USAT groups. In both groups, incidence of postthrombotic syndrome was very low with good quality of life. SUMMARY Background In patients with acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (IFDVT), catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) aims to prevent the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Adding intravascular high-frequency, low-power ultrasound energy to CDT does not seem to improve the immediate thrombolysis results but its impact on clinical outcomes at 12 months is not known. Patients/Methods In this randomized-controlled trial, 48 patients (mean age 50 ± 21 years; 52% women) with acute IFDVT were randomized to conventional CDT (n = 24) or ultrasound-assisted CDT (USAT; n = 24). In both groups, a fixed-dose thrombolysis regimen (20 mg r-tPA over 15 h) was used, followed by routine stenting of residual venous obstruction. At 12 months, PTS and venous disease severity (Villalta score and revised Venous Clinical Severity Score [rVCSS]), disease-specific quality of live (QOL; CIVIQ-20) and duplex-sonographic outcomes were assessed. Results Among the 45 surviving patients, 40 (89%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 76-96%) patients were free from PTS (defined as Villalta score < 5 points; 83%, 95% CI 61-95% in the USAT and 96%, 95% CI 77-100% in the CDT group), with a similar mean total Villalta score of 2.3 ± 2.9 vs. 1.7 ± 1.6, and a mean total rVCSS of 3.0 ± 3.5 vs. 2.7 ± 2.9 in the USAT and the CDT groups, respectively. Both groups had good disease-specific QOL with a CIVIQ-20 score of 29.4 ± 11.8 vs. 26.1 ± 7.8, respectively. Primary (100% vs. 92%) and secondary (100% vs. 96%) iliofemoral patency rates and presence of femoro-popliteal venous reflux (39% vs. 33%) were similar in both groups. Conclusion The addition of intravascular ultrasound energy to conventional CDT for the treatment of acute IFDVT did not have any impact on relevant clinical or duplex sonographic outcomes, which were favorable in both study groups. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier:NCT01482273.

Abstract

Essentials Acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis can be treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT). We performed a randomized trial comparing conventional CDT versus ultrasound-assisted CDT (USAT). Clinical and duplex sonographic outcomes at 12 months were similar in the CDT and USAT groups. In both groups, incidence of postthrombotic syndrome was very low with good quality of life. SUMMARY Background In patients with acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (IFDVT), catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) aims to prevent the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Adding intravascular high-frequency, low-power ultrasound energy to CDT does not seem to improve the immediate thrombolysis results but its impact on clinical outcomes at 12 months is not known. Patients/Methods In this randomized-controlled trial, 48 patients (mean age 50 ± 21 years; 52% women) with acute IFDVT were randomized to conventional CDT (n = 24) or ultrasound-assisted CDT (USAT; n = 24). In both groups, a fixed-dose thrombolysis regimen (20 mg r-tPA over 15 h) was used, followed by routine stenting of residual venous obstruction. At 12 months, PTS and venous disease severity (Villalta score and revised Venous Clinical Severity Score [rVCSS]), disease-specific quality of live (QOL; CIVIQ-20) and duplex-sonographic outcomes were assessed. Results Among the 45 surviving patients, 40 (89%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 76-96%) patients were free from PTS (defined as Villalta score < 5 points; 83%, 95% CI 61-95% in the USAT and 96%, 95% CI 77-100% in the CDT group), with a similar mean total Villalta score of 2.3 ± 2.9 vs. 1.7 ± 1.6, and a mean total rVCSS of 3.0 ± 3.5 vs. 2.7 ± 2.9 in the USAT and the CDT groups, respectively. Both groups had good disease-specific QOL with a CIVIQ-20 score of 29.4 ± 11.8 vs. 26.1 ± 7.8, respectively. Primary (100% vs. 92%) and secondary (100% vs. 96%) iliofemoral patency rates and presence of femoro-popliteal venous reflux (39% vs. 33%) were similar in both groups. Conclusion The addition of intravascular ultrasound energy to conventional CDT for the treatment of acute IFDVT did not have any impact on relevant clinical or duplex sonographic outcomes, which were favorable in both study groups. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier:NCT01482273.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Angiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2017
Deposited On:08 May 2018 15:25
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 15:40
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1538-7933
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jth.13709
PubMed ID:28440041
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID32003B_140804
  • : Project TitleThe BERN Ultrasound-enhanced Thrombolysis for Ilio-Femoral deep vein thrombosis versUs standard catheter directed thromboLysis trial

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