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Functionally separated networks for self-paced and externally-cued motor execution in Parkinson's disease: Evidence from deep brain recordings in humans


Bichsel, Oliver; Gassert, Roger; Stieglitz, Lennart; Uhl, Mechtild; Baumann-Vogel, Heide; Waldvogel, Daniel; Baumann, Christian R; Imbach, Lukas L (2018). Functionally separated networks for self-paced and externally-cued motor execution in Parkinson's disease: Evidence from deep brain recordings in humans. NeuroImage, 177:20-29.

Abstract

Spatially segregated cortico-basal ganglia networks have been proposed for the control of goal-directed and habitual behavior. In Parkinson's disease, selective loss of dopaminergic neurons regulating sensorimotor (habitual) behavior might therefore predominantly cause deficits in habitual motor control, whereas control of goal-directed movement is relatively preserved. Following this hypothesis, we examined the electrophysiology of cortico-basal ganglia networks in Parkinson patients emulating habitual and goal-directed motor control during self-paced and externally-cued finger tapping, respectively, while simultaneously recording local field potentials in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and surface EEG. Only externally-cued movements induced a pro-kinetic event-related beta-desynchronization, whereas beta-oscillations were continuously suppressed during self-paced movements. Connectivity analysis revealed higher synchronicity (phase-locking value) between the STN and central electrodes during self-paced and higher STN to frontal phase-locking during externally-cued movements. Our data provide direct electrophysiological support for the existence of functionally segregated cortico-basal ganglia networks controlling motor behavior in Parkinson patients, and corroborate the assumption of Parkinson patients being shifted from habitual towards goal-directed behavior.

Abstract

Spatially segregated cortico-basal ganglia networks have been proposed for the control of goal-directed and habitual behavior. In Parkinson's disease, selective loss of dopaminergic neurons regulating sensorimotor (habitual) behavior might therefore predominantly cause deficits in habitual motor control, whereas control of goal-directed movement is relatively preserved. Following this hypothesis, we examined the electrophysiology of cortico-basal ganglia networks in Parkinson patients emulating habitual and goal-directed motor control during self-paced and externally-cued finger tapping, respectively, while simultaneously recording local field potentials in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and surface EEG. Only externally-cued movements induced a pro-kinetic event-related beta-desynchronization, whereas beta-oscillations were continuously suppressed during self-paced movements. Connectivity analysis revealed higher synchronicity (phase-locking value) between the STN and central electrodes during self-paced and higher STN to frontal phase-locking during externally-cued movements. Our data provide direct electrophysiological support for the existence of functionally segregated cortico-basal ganglia networks controlling motor behavior in Parkinson patients, and corroborate the assumption of Parkinson patients being shifted from habitual towards goal-directed behavior.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Neurology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:5 May 2018
Deposited On:24 May 2018 09:06
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 07:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.05.012
PubMed ID:29738912

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