Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Response to chronic sleep restriction, extension, and subsequent total sleep deprivation in humans: adaptation or preserved sleep homeostasis?


Skorucak, Jelena; Arbon, Emma L; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Achermann, Peter (2018). Response to chronic sleep restriction, extension, and subsequent total sleep deprivation in humans: adaptation or preserved sleep homeostasis? Sleep, 41(7):zsy078.

Abstract

Sleep is regulated by a homeostatic process which in the two-process model of human sleep regulation is represented by EEG slow-wave activity (SWA). Many studies of acute manipulation of wake duration have confirmed the precise homeostatic regulation of SWA in rodents and humans. However, some chronic sleep restriction studies in rodents show that the sleep homeostatic response, as indexed by SWA, is absent or diminishes suggesting adaptation occurs. Here, we investigate the response to 7 days of sleep restriction (6 h time in bed) and extension (10 h time in bed) as well as the response to subsequent total sleep deprivation in 35 healthy participants in a cross-over design. The homeostatic response was quantified by analyzing sleep structure and SWA measures. Sleep restriction resulted primarily in a reduction of REM sleep. SWA and accumulated SWA (slow-wave energy) were not much affected by sleep extension/restriction. The SWA responses did not diminish significantly in the course of the intervention and did not deviate significantly from the predictions of the two-process model. The response to total sleep deprivation consisted of an increase in SWA, rise rate of SWA and SWE and did not differ between the two conditions. The data show that changes in sleep duration within an ecologically relevant range, have a marked effect on REM sleep and that SWA responds in accordance with predictions based on a saturating exponential increase during wake and an exponential decline in sleep of homeostatic sleep pressure during both chronic sleep restriction and extension.

Abstract

Sleep is regulated by a homeostatic process which in the two-process model of human sleep regulation is represented by EEG slow-wave activity (SWA). Many studies of acute manipulation of wake duration have confirmed the precise homeostatic regulation of SWA in rodents and humans. However, some chronic sleep restriction studies in rodents show that the sleep homeostatic response, as indexed by SWA, is absent or diminishes suggesting adaptation occurs. Here, we investigate the response to 7 days of sleep restriction (6 h time in bed) and extension (10 h time in bed) as well as the response to subsequent total sleep deprivation in 35 healthy participants in a cross-over design. The homeostatic response was quantified by analyzing sleep structure and SWA measures. Sleep restriction resulted primarily in a reduction of REM sleep. SWA and accumulated SWA (slow-wave energy) were not much affected by sleep extension/restriction. The SWA responses did not diminish significantly in the course of the intervention and did not deviate significantly from the predictions of the two-process model. The response to total sleep deprivation consisted of an increase in SWA, rise rate of SWA and SWE and did not differ between the two conditions. The data show that changes in sleep duration within an ecologically relevant range, have a marked effect on REM sleep and that SWA responds in accordance with predictions based on a saturating exponential increase during wake and an exponential decline in sleep of homeostatic sleep pressure during both chronic sleep restriction and extension.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 07 Jun 2018
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physiology (medical), Clinical Neurology
Language:English
Date:2 May 2018
Deposited On:07 Jun 2018 08:32
Last Modified:17 Mar 2019 06:45
Publisher:American Academy of Sleep Medicine
ISSN:0161-8105
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsy078
PubMed ID:29722893
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID32003B_146643
  • : Project TitleSleep onset and other state transitions: insights from quantitative EEG analysis

Download