Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Disentangling historical signal and pollinator selection on the micromorphology of flowers: an example from the floral epidermis of the Nymphaeaceae


Coiro, Mario; Barone Lumaga, Maria Rosaria (2018). Disentangling historical signal and pollinator selection on the micromorphology of flowers: an example from the floral epidermis of the Nymphaeaceae. Plant Biology, 20(5):902-915.

Abstract

The family Nymphaeaceae includes most of the diversity among the ANA‐grade angiosperms. Among the species of this family, floral structures and pollination strategies are quite varied. The genus Victoria, as well as subgenera Lotos and Hydrocallis in Nymphaea, presents night‐blooming, scented flowers pollinated by scarab beetles. Such similar pollination strategies have led to macromorphological similarities among the flowers of these species, which could be interpreted as homologies or convergences based on different phylogenetic hypotheses about the relationships of these groups.
We employed SEM of floral epidermis for seven species of the Nymphaeaceae with contrasting pollination biology to identify the main characters of the floral organs and the potential homologous nature of the structures involved in pollinator attraction. Moreover, we used TEM to observe ultrastructure of papillate‐conical epidermis in the stamen of Victoria cruziana. We then tested the phylogenetic or ecological distribution of these traits using both consensus network approaches and ancestral state reconstruction on fixed phylogenies.
Our results show that the night‐blooming flowers present different specializations in their epidermis, with Victoria cruziana presenting the most elaborate floral anatomy. We also identify for the first time the presence of conical‐papillate cells in the order Nymphaeales. The epidermal characters tend to reflect phylogenetic relationships more than convergence due to pollinator selection.
These results point to an independent and parallel evolution of scarab pollination in Nymphaeaceae, and show the promise of floral anatomy as a phylogenetic marker. Moreover, they indicate a degree of sophistication in the anatomical basis of cantharophilous flowers in the Nymphaeales that diverges from the most simplistic views of floral evolution in the angiosperms.
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

The family Nymphaeaceae includes most of the diversity among the ANA‐grade angiosperms. Among the species of this family, floral structures and pollination strategies are quite varied. The genus Victoria, as well as subgenera Lotos and Hydrocallis in Nymphaea, presents night‐blooming, scented flowers pollinated by scarab beetles. Such similar pollination strategies have led to macromorphological similarities among the flowers of these species, which could be interpreted as homologies or convergences based on different phylogenetic hypotheses about the relationships of these groups.
We employed SEM of floral epidermis for seven species of the Nymphaeaceae with contrasting pollination biology to identify the main characters of the floral organs and the potential homologous nature of the structures involved in pollinator attraction. Moreover, we used TEM to observe ultrastructure of papillate‐conical epidermis in the stamen of Victoria cruziana. We then tested the phylogenetic or ecological distribution of these traits using both consensus network approaches and ancestral state reconstruction on fixed phylogenies.
Our results show that the night‐blooming flowers present different specializations in their epidermis, with Victoria cruziana presenting the most elaborate floral anatomy. We also identify for the first time the presence of conical‐papillate cells in the order Nymphaeales. The epidermal characters tend to reflect phylogenetic relationships more than convergence due to pollinator selection.
These results point to an independent and parallel evolution of scarab pollination in Nymphaeaceae, and show the promise of floral anatomy as a phylogenetic marker. Moreover, they indicate a degree of sophistication in the anatomical basis of cantharophilous flowers in the Nymphaeales that diverges from the most simplistic views of floral evolution in the angiosperms.
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
8 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

71 downloads since deposited on 06 Jun 2018
28 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Life Sciences > Plant Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Plant Science, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:06 Jun 2018 12:57
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 07:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1435-8603
Additional Information:For accepted manuscripts: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Coiro, Mario; Barone Lumaga, Maria Rosaria (2018). Disentangling historical signal and pollinator selection on the micromorphology of flowers: an example from the floral epidermis of the Nymphaeaceae. Plant Biology:Epub ahead of print., which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/plb.12850. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms).
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/plb.12850

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Disentangling historical signal and pollinator selection on the micromorphology of flowers: an example from the floral epidermis of the Nymphaeaceae'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 2MB
View at publisher