Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Cold pressor test in spinal cord injury-revisited


Hubli, Michèle; Bolt, Doris; Krassioukov, Andrei V (2018). Cold pressor test in spinal cord injury-revisited. Spinal Cord, 56(6):528-537.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN Systematic review. OBJECTIVES A spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results in alterations of cardiovascular physiology. In order to investigate such alterations, the cold pressor test (CPT) has been used as an established challenge test. This review summarizes the basic physiology underlying a CPT, discusses potential mechanisms responsible for abnormal pressor responses following SCI, and highlights the utility of CPT in the SCI population. SETTING Canada and Switzerland. METHODS We have completed a comprehensive review of studies that have investigated the effect of foot or hand CPT on hemodynamic indices in individuals with SCI. RESULTS Depending on the level of spinal cord lesion and the location of cold application, i.e., above or below the lesion, mean arterial pressure typically increases (ranging between 4 and 23 mmHg), while heart rate responses demonstrated either a decrease or an increase (ranging between -4 and 24 bpm) during CPT. The increase in blood pressure during foot CPT in high-level lesions might not necessarily be attributed to a physiological CPT response as seen in able-bodied individuals, but rather due to a reflexic sympathetic discharge below the level of lesion, known as autonomic dysreflexia. CONCLUSIONS Further investigations in a wider range of individuals with SCI including incomplete injuries might be helpful to examine the ability of CPT assessing the integrity of the autonomic nervous system following SCI. Furthermore, additional autonomic tests are needed to emphasize the integrity of autonomic pathways and to account for the complexity of the autonomic nervous system.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN Systematic review. OBJECTIVES A spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results in alterations of cardiovascular physiology. In order to investigate such alterations, the cold pressor test (CPT) has been used as an established challenge test. This review summarizes the basic physiology underlying a CPT, discusses potential mechanisms responsible for abnormal pressor responses following SCI, and highlights the utility of CPT in the SCI population. SETTING Canada and Switzerland. METHODS We have completed a comprehensive review of studies that have investigated the effect of foot or hand CPT on hemodynamic indices in individuals with SCI. RESULTS Depending on the level of spinal cord lesion and the location of cold application, i.e., above or below the lesion, mean arterial pressure typically increases (ranging between 4 and 23 mmHg), while heart rate responses demonstrated either a decrease or an increase (ranging between -4 and 24 bpm) during CPT. The increase in blood pressure during foot CPT in high-level lesions might not necessarily be attributed to a physiological CPT response as seen in able-bodied individuals, but rather due to a reflexic sympathetic discharge below the level of lesion, known as autonomic dysreflexia. CONCLUSIONS Further investigations in a wider range of individuals with SCI including incomplete injuries might be helpful to examine the ability of CPT assessing the integrity of the autonomic nervous system following SCI. Furthermore, additional autonomic tests are needed to emphasize the integrity of autonomic pathways and to account for the complexity of the autonomic nervous system.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2018
Deposited On:27 Jun 2018 12:30
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:31
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1362-4393
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41393-017-0037-z
PubMed ID:29259348

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library