Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Influence of elevation and habitat disturbance on the functional diversity of ferns and lycophytes


Carvajal-Hernández, César I; Gómez-Díaz, Jorge A; Kessler, Michael; Krömer, Thorsten (2018). Influence of elevation and habitat disturbance on the functional diversity of ferns and lycophytes. Plant Ecology and Diversity, 11(3):335-347.

Abstract

Background: The loss of functional keystone species may lead to the loss of key functions in the ecosystem. Few studies so far have addressed the functionality of specific morphological traits of ferns. Aims: Evaluate the functional diversity and how habitat degradation affected the functional diversity of fern assemblages. Methods: Along an elevational gradient in central Veracruz, Mexico, we recorded all ferns and lycophytes species in plots placed in old-growth, degraded and secondary forest and quantified 15 morphological traits. We calculated Functional Diversity (FD) and Functional Beta Diversity (FBet). Results: We found a positive correlation between species richness and FD, with maximum FD in the species-rich plots located in humid montane forests at intermediate elevations, which were also functionally the most distinct in the analysis of FBet. There was no consistent relationship of FD and FBet to habitat degradation. Conclusions: Functional diversity is not generally related to habitat degradation. The low values of FD in degraded and secondary forest stands at mid-elevations indicated a loss of functions with degradation, whereas FD values in ecosystems of the lower sites indicated functional.

Abstract

Background: The loss of functional keystone species may lead to the loss of key functions in the ecosystem. Few studies so far have addressed the functionality of specific morphological traits of ferns. Aims: Evaluate the functional diversity and how habitat degradation affected the functional diversity of fern assemblages. Methods: Along an elevational gradient in central Veracruz, Mexico, we recorded all ferns and lycophytes species in plots placed in old-growth, degraded and secondary forest and quantified 15 morphological traits. We calculated Functional Diversity (FD) and Functional Beta Diversity (FBet). Results: We found a positive correlation between species richness and FD, with maximum FD in the species-rich plots located in humid montane forests at intermediate elevations, which were also functionally the most distinct in the analysis of FBet. There was no consistent relationship of FD and FBet to habitat degradation. Conclusions: Functional diversity is not generally related to habitat degradation. The low values of FD in degraded and secondary forest stands at mid-elevations indicated a loss of functions with degradation, whereas FD values in ecosystems of the lower sites indicated functional.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 03 Jul 2018
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Physical Sciences > Ecology
Life Sciences > Plant Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Plant Science, Ecology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:4 May 2018
Deposited On:03 Jul 2018 12:13
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 07:23
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1755-0874
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2018.1484526

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members