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BOLD signal in sensorimotor regions reveals differential encoding of passive forefinger velocity and displacement amplitude


Duenas, Julio; Sulzer, James; Stämpfli, Philipp; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kollias, Spyros; Seifritz, Erich; Gassert, Roger (2018). BOLD signal in sensorimotor regions reveals differential encoding of passive forefinger velocity and displacement amplitude. NeuroImage, 173:332-340.

Abstract

Peripheral encoding of movement kinematics has been well-characterized, but there is little understanding of the relationship between movement kinematics and associated brain activation. We hypothesized that kinematics of passive movement is differentially represented in the sensorimotor network, reflecting the well-studied afferent responses to movement. A robotic forefinger manipulandum was used to induce passive kinematic stimuli and monitor interaction force in 41 healthy participants during whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Levels of forefinger displacement amplitude and velocity were presented in flexion and extension. Increases in velocity were linearly associated with activation in contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1), bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), primary motor cortex, and supplementary motor area. No difference in activation was found for direction of the finger movement. Unexpectedly, S1 and S2 activation decreased nonlinearly with increasing displacement amplitude. We conclude that while straightforward relations were found with velocity, the complex neural representation of displacement amplitude suggests a more nuanced relationship between peripheral responses to kinematic stimuli and sensorimotor network activity. Here we present a novel, systematic characterization of the whole-brain response to passive movement kinematics.

Abstract

Peripheral encoding of movement kinematics has been well-characterized, but there is little understanding of the relationship between movement kinematics and associated brain activation. We hypothesized that kinematics of passive movement is differentially represented in the sensorimotor network, reflecting the well-studied afferent responses to movement. A robotic forefinger manipulandum was used to induce passive kinematic stimuli and monitor interaction force in 41 healthy participants during whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Levels of forefinger displacement amplitude and velocity were presented in flexion and extension. Increases in velocity were linearly associated with activation in contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1), bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), primary motor cortex, and supplementary motor area. No difference in activation was found for direction of the finger movement. Unexpectedly, S1 and S2 activation decreased nonlinearly with increasing displacement amplitude. We conclude that while straightforward relations were found with velocity, the complex neural representation of displacement amplitude suggests a more nuanced relationship between peripheral responses to kinematic stimuli and sensorimotor network activity. Here we present a novel, systematic characterization of the whole-brain response to passive movement kinematics.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Neurology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Kinesthesia, MRI-compatible robotics, Passive movement kinematics, Proprioception, Sensorimotor cortex, Somatosensation, fMRI
Language:English
Date:June 2018
Deposited On:09 Aug 2018 15:28
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 07:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.02.052
PubMed ID:29501553
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDCR32I3_138260
  • : Project TitleNeurofeedback for improvement of coordinated motor function

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