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Detection of painted-over traces of blood and seminal fluid


Barrera, V; Haas, Cordula; Meixner, E A; Fliss, Barbara (2018). Detection of painted-over traces of blood and seminal fluid. International journal of legal medicine, 132(4):1067-1074.

Abstract

Dealing with a refurbished crime scene is a special challenge for forensic investigators. In such cases, a crime scene may not have only been cleaned in order to erase all traces but the walls of an indoor crime scene could also be painted over in order to mask traces of the crime. So far, very few publications have shown that painted-over traces of blood and seminal fluid can be detected using a forensic light source or infrared photography. To date, there have been no systematically executed research studies including guidelines on which settings to use depending on the color of the wall. Moreover, no comparative study has addressed the question of whether it is better to use infrared photography or a forensic light source to visualize painted-over bloodstains. The present study covers the aforementioned gaps and shows that painted-over bloodstains are most easily visualized by infrared photography, while traces of seminal fluid are most easily visualized at 440 nm in combination with a yellow filter-both independent of the color of the wall paint.

Abstract

Dealing with a refurbished crime scene is a special challenge for forensic investigators. In such cases, a crime scene may not have only been cleaned in order to erase all traces but the walls of an indoor crime scene could also be painted over in order to mask traces of the crime. So far, very few publications have shown that painted-over traces of blood and seminal fluid can be detected using a forensic light source or infrared photography. To date, there have been no systematically executed research studies including guidelines on which settings to use depending on the color of the wall. Moreover, no comparative study has addressed the question of whether it is better to use infrared photography or a forensic light source to visualize painted-over bloodstains. The present study covers the aforementioned gaps and shows that painted-over bloodstains are most easily visualized by infrared photography, while traces of seminal fluid are most easily visualized at 440 nm in combination with a yellow filter-both independent of the color of the wall paint.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Legal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Pathology and Forensic Medicine, Alternative light source (ALS); Blood; Cleaned crime scene; Forensic light source; Forensic photography; Infrared photography; Paint; Semen
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:21 Aug 2018 17:22
Last Modified:21 Aug 2018 17:22
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0937-9827
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00414-018-1787-7
PubMed ID:29374311

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