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Splitting of circulating red blood cells as -mechanism of erythrocyte maturation in developing zebrafish, chick and mouse embryos


Brönnimann, Daniel; Annese, Tiziana; Gorr, Thomas A; Djonov, Valentin (2018). Splitting of circulating red blood cells as -mechanism of erythrocyte maturation in developing zebrafish, chick and mouse embryos. Journal of Experimental Biology, 221(Pt 15):jeb184564.

Abstract

Nucleated circulating red blood cells (RBCs) of developing zebrafish, chick and mouse embryos can actively proliferate. While marrow- or organ-mediated erythropoiesis has been widely studied, transforming processes of circulating RBCs are under little scrutiny. We employed confocal, stereo- and electron microscopy to document the maturation of intravascular RBCs. In zebrafish embryos (32-72 hours post fertilization), in the caudal vein plexus follows a four-step program: (i) Nuclear division with continued cytoplasmic connection between somata. (ii) Dumbbell-shaped RBCs tangle at transluminal vascular pillars. (iii) Elongation, and (iv) Disruption of soma-to-soma connection. Dividing RBCs of chick embryos, however, retain the nucleus in one of their somata. Here, acts to pinch-off portions of cytoplasm, organelles and ribosomes. Dumbbell-shaped primitive RBCs re-appeared as circulation constituents in mouse embryos. The of circulating RBCs, thus, represents a biologically relevant mechanism of RBC division and maturation during early vertebrate ontogeny.

Abstract

Nucleated circulating red blood cells (RBCs) of developing zebrafish, chick and mouse embryos can actively proliferate. While marrow- or organ-mediated erythropoiesis has been widely studied, transforming processes of circulating RBCs are under little scrutiny. We employed confocal, stereo- and electron microscopy to document the maturation of intravascular RBCs. In zebrafish embryos (32-72 hours post fertilization), in the caudal vein plexus follows a four-step program: (i) Nuclear division with continued cytoplasmic connection between somata. (ii) Dumbbell-shaped RBCs tangle at transluminal vascular pillars. (iii) Elongation, and (iv) Disruption of soma-to-soma connection. Dividing RBCs of chick embryos, however, retain the nucleus in one of their somata. Here, acts to pinch-off portions of cytoplasm, organelles and ribosomes. Dumbbell-shaped primitive RBCs re-appeared as circulation constituents in mouse embryos. The of circulating RBCs, thus, represents a biologically relevant mechanism of RBC division and maturation during early vertebrate ontogeny.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Insect Science, Animal Science and Zoology, Aquatic Science, Physiology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Molecular Biology
Language:English
Date:10 August 2018
Deposited On:22 Aug 2018 13:21
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:34
Publisher:Company of Biologists
ISSN:0022-0949
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.184564
PubMed ID:29903841

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