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Cooperative hand movements in tetraplegic spinal cord injury patients: Preserved neural coupling


Scharfenberger, T M; Schrafl-Altermatt, M; Dietz, V (2018). Cooperative hand movements in tetraplegic spinal cord injury patients: Preserved neural coupling. Clinical Neurophysiology, 129(10):2059-2064.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To evaluate whether the task-specific neural coupling mechanism during the performance of cooperative hand movements is preserved in tetraplegic subjects.
METHODS Recordings of ipsilateral and contralateral electromyographic reflex responses in activated forearm muscles and bilateral somatosensory potentials (SSEP) to unilateral ulnar nerve stimulations during rest, cooperative and non-cooperative hand movements.
RESULTS Contralateral reflex responses were present in almost all patients during cooperative hand movements but small in amplitude when hand function was severely impaired. Ipsilateral SSEP potentials were enhanced during both cooperative and, in contrast to healthy subjects, also non-cooperative bimanual movements.
CONCLUSIONS Both results indicate a strong involvement of ipsilateral non-damaged cervical tracts and hemispheres in the control of bimanual hand movements in tetraplegic subjects.
SIGNIFICANCE This study on the neural control of bimanual movements in patients suffering a cervical injury allows designing therapeutic approaches for the improvement of hand function that are based on physiological insights.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To evaluate whether the task-specific neural coupling mechanism during the performance of cooperative hand movements is preserved in tetraplegic subjects.
METHODS Recordings of ipsilateral and contralateral electromyographic reflex responses in activated forearm muscles and bilateral somatosensory potentials (SSEP) to unilateral ulnar nerve stimulations during rest, cooperative and non-cooperative hand movements.
RESULTS Contralateral reflex responses were present in almost all patients during cooperative hand movements but small in amplitude when hand function was severely impaired. Ipsilateral SSEP potentials were enhanced during both cooperative and, in contrast to healthy subjects, also non-cooperative bimanual movements.
CONCLUSIONS Both results indicate a strong involvement of ipsilateral non-damaged cervical tracts and hemispheres in the control of bimanual hand movements in tetraplegic subjects.
SIGNIFICANCE This study on the neural control of bimanual movements in patients suffering a cervical injury allows designing therapeutic approaches for the improvement of hand function that are based on physiological insights.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physiology (medical), Sensory Systems, Neurology, Clinical Neurology
Language:English
Date:1 August 2018
Deposited On:30 Aug 2018 08:47
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:34
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2018.06.028
PubMed ID:30077074

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