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A Portrait of Pacing Profile of Cross-Country Skiers in the Vasaloppet 2004-2017


Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Villiger, Elias; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat (2018). A Portrait of Pacing Profile of Cross-Country Skiers in the Vasaloppet 2004-2017. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 39(11):875-880.

Abstract

The aim of the study was to examine the effect of performance group by race time (10 groups;<3 h, 3-4 h, and so on up to>12 h) on pacing in women (n=19,465) and men (n=164,454) finishers in the 'Vasaloppet' cross-country (XC) skiing race from 2004 to 2017. The speed in the fastest and slowest split was analysed as a percentage of the mean race speed and pacing was defined as the difference (%) between the fastest and slowest split. Women had a larger pace range than men (44.0±10.6% versus 41.1±12.5%, respectively, p<0.001, d=0.25). An almost perfect relationship between performance group and pacing was observed in women (r=0.900, p<0.001) and men (r=0.908, p<0.001). A large main effect of performance on pacing was observed in women (p<0.001, η=0.292), where the smaller range was in the<4 h group (22.8±3.3%) and the largest in the 10-11 h group (49.2±9.9%). In men, the corresponding values were 21.6±2.2% (<3 h group) and 51.6±11.2% (10-11 h group; p<0.001, η=0.474). Based on these findings, it was concluded that fast XC skiers had relatively the most even pacing and pacing became less even with decreasing performance. This information is of practical value for coaches working with XC skiers to develop optimal sex- and performance-tailored pacing strategies.

Abstract

The aim of the study was to examine the effect of performance group by race time (10 groups;<3 h, 3-4 h, and so on up to>12 h) on pacing in women (n=19,465) and men (n=164,454) finishers in the 'Vasaloppet' cross-country (XC) skiing race from 2004 to 2017. The speed in the fastest and slowest split was analysed as a percentage of the mean race speed and pacing was defined as the difference (%) between the fastest and slowest split. Women had a larger pace range than men (44.0±10.6% versus 41.1±12.5%, respectively, p<0.001, d=0.25). An almost perfect relationship between performance group and pacing was observed in women (r=0.900, p<0.001) and men (r=0.908, p<0.001). A large main effect of performance on pacing was observed in women (p<0.001, η=0.292), where the smaller range was in the<4 h group (22.8±3.3%) and the largest in the 10-11 h group (49.2±9.9%). In men, the corresponding values were 21.6±2.2% (<3 h group) and 51.6±11.2% (10-11 h group; p<0.001, η=0.474). Based on these findings, it was concluded that fast XC skiers had relatively the most even pacing and pacing became less even with decreasing performance. This information is of practical value for coaches working with XC skiers to develop optimal sex- and performance-tailored pacing strategies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 October 2018
Deposited On:30 Aug 2018 09:09
Last Modified:26 Sep 2018 01:03
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:0172-4622
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/a-0592-7811
PubMed ID:30096721

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