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Relationship Between Rhinitis, Asthma, and Eczema and the Presence of Sensitization in Young Swiss Adults


Steiner, Urs C; Bachmann, Lucas M; Soyka, Micheal B; Regenass, Stephan; Steinegger, Lukas; Probst, Elsbeth (2018). Relationship Between Rhinitis, Asthma, and Eczema and the Presence of Sensitization in Young Swiss Adults. Allergy & Rhinology, 9:215265671877360.

Abstract

Background: Rhinitis is a very common disease with allergies being the most frequent causative factor. It can co-occur together with asthma and eczema in atopic as well as in nonatopic patients. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of allergic sensitization within patient groups with rhinitis in consideration of the co-occurring disorders of asthma and eczema. Methods: Students of the third year of medical school completed an anonymous questionnaire on age, gender, and clinical symptoms, such as seasonal rhinitis, perennial rhinitis, asthma, and eczema, and underwent an ImmunoCAP Rapid test. We calculated the prevalence of sensitization within subgroups of patients reporting allergic disorders, such as rhinitis, asthma, and eczema. Results: Questionnaires and ImmunoCAP Rapid tests of 1513 medical students were analyzed. The participants' self-reported presence of seasonal/perennial rhinitis, asthma, and eczema was compared to the presence of sensitization. Data of 1467 subjects could be analyzed. Seasonal rhinitis was the most common symptom, followed by eczema, asthma, and perennial rhinitis. The participants were differentiated into 16 subgroups according to the combined clinical manifestations of the different symptoms and association to sensitization within subgroups. The prevalence of sensitization ranged from 18% in subjects reporting only eczema without any other symptom to 100% in those reporting to have asthma, seasonal/perennial rhinitis, and eczema together. In subjects reporting no sign or symptom at all, the prevalence of sensitization was 19%. Seasonal rhinitis was the strongest single predictor for sensitization with the highest proportion of sensitized participants in all symptom combinations (67%-100%), followed by perennial rhinitis (31%-100%), asthma (30%-100%), and eczema (18%-100%). Conclusion: Rhinitis most often is associated with allergen sensitization, and the probability of sensitization is substantially enhanced by co-occurrence of asthma. A careful assessment of clinical signs and symptoms is important and enables the selection of patients in whom targeted diagnostic analysis and therapy is appropriate.Trial registration: retrospectively registered by the Cantonal Ethics Committee Zurich on 22.01.2016; Nr: 08-2016.

Abstract

Background: Rhinitis is a very common disease with allergies being the most frequent causative factor. It can co-occur together with asthma and eczema in atopic as well as in nonatopic patients. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of allergic sensitization within patient groups with rhinitis in consideration of the co-occurring disorders of asthma and eczema. Methods: Students of the third year of medical school completed an anonymous questionnaire on age, gender, and clinical symptoms, such as seasonal rhinitis, perennial rhinitis, asthma, and eczema, and underwent an ImmunoCAP Rapid test. We calculated the prevalence of sensitization within subgroups of patients reporting allergic disorders, such as rhinitis, asthma, and eczema. Results: Questionnaires and ImmunoCAP Rapid tests of 1513 medical students were analyzed. The participants' self-reported presence of seasonal/perennial rhinitis, asthma, and eczema was compared to the presence of sensitization. Data of 1467 subjects could be analyzed. Seasonal rhinitis was the most common symptom, followed by eczema, asthma, and perennial rhinitis. The participants were differentiated into 16 subgroups according to the combined clinical manifestations of the different symptoms and association to sensitization within subgroups. The prevalence of sensitization ranged from 18% in subjects reporting only eczema without any other symptom to 100% in those reporting to have asthma, seasonal/perennial rhinitis, and eczema together. In subjects reporting no sign or symptom at all, the prevalence of sensitization was 19%. Seasonal rhinitis was the strongest single predictor for sensitization with the highest proportion of sensitized participants in all symptom combinations (67%-100%), followed by perennial rhinitis (31%-100%), asthma (30%-100%), and eczema (18%-100%). Conclusion: Rhinitis most often is associated with allergen sensitization, and the probability of sensitization is substantially enhanced by co-occurrence of asthma. A careful assessment of clinical signs and symptoms is important and enables the selection of patients in whom targeted diagnostic analysis and therapy is appropriate.Trial registration: retrospectively registered by the Cantonal Ethics Committee Zurich on 22.01.2016; Nr: 08-2016.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Immunology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:30 Aug 2018 12:47
Last Modified:13 Feb 2019 09:41
Publisher:OceanSide Publications
ISSN:2152-6567
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/2152656718773606
PubMed ID:29977657

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