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Cellular self-assembly into 3D microtissues enhances the angiogenic activity and functional neovascularization capacity of human cardiopoietic stem cells


Wolint, Petra; Bopp, Annina; Woloszyk, Anna; Tian, Yinghua; Evrova, Olivera; Hilbe, Monika; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Buschmann, Johanna; Emmert, Maximilian Y (2019). Cellular self-assembly into 3D microtissues enhances the angiogenic activity and functional neovascularization capacity of human cardiopoietic stem cells. Angiogenesis, 22(1):37-52.

Abstract

While cell therapy has been proposed as next-generation therapy to treat the diseased heart, current strategies display only limited clinical efficacy. Besides the ongoing quest for the ideal cell type, in particular the very low retention rate of single-cell (SC) suspensions after delivery remains a major problem. To improve cellular retention, cellular self-assembly into 3D microtissues (MTs) prior to transplantation has emerged as an encouraging alternative. Importantly, 3D-MTs have also been reported to enhance the angiogenic activity and neovascularization potential of stem cells. Therefore, here using the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay we comprehensively evaluate the impact of cell format (SCs versus 3D-MTs) on the angiogenic potential of human cardiopoietic stem cells, a promising second-generation cell type for cardiac repair. Biodegradable collagen scaffolds were seeded with human cardiopoietic stem cells, either as SCs or as 3D-MTs generated by using a modified hanging drop method. Thereafter, seeded scaffolds were placed on the CAM of living chicken embryos and analyzed for their perfusion capacity in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging assessment which was then linked to a longitudinal histomorphometric ex vivo analysis comprising blood vessel density and characteristics such as shape and size. Cellular self-assembly into 3D-MTs led to a significant increase of vessel density mainly driven by a higher number of neo-capillary formation. In contrast, SC-seeded scaffolds displayed a higher frequency of larger neo-vessels resulting in an overall 1.76-fold higher total vessel area (TVA). Importantly, despite that larger TVA in SC-seeded group, the mean perfusion capacity (MPC) was comparable between groups, therefore suggesting functional superiority together with an enhanced perfusion efficacy of the neo-vessels in 3D-MT-seeded scaffolds. This was further underlined by a 1.64-fold higher perfusion ratio when relating MPC to TVA. Our study shows that cellular self-assembly of human cardiopoietic stem cells into 3D-MTs substantially enhances their overall angiogenic potential and their functional neovascularization capacity. Hence, the concept of 3D-MTs may be considered to increase the therapeutic efficacy of future cell therapy concepts.

Abstract

While cell therapy has been proposed as next-generation therapy to treat the diseased heart, current strategies display only limited clinical efficacy. Besides the ongoing quest for the ideal cell type, in particular the very low retention rate of single-cell (SC) suspensions after delivery remains a major problem. To improve cellular retention, cellular self-assembly into 3D microtissues (MTs) prior to transplantation has emerged as an encouraging alternative. Importantly, 3D-MTs have also been reported to enhance the angiogenic activity and neovascularization potential of stem cells. Therefore, here using the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay we comprehensively evaluate the impact of cell format (SCs versus 3D-MTs) on the angiogenic potential of human cardiopoietic stem cells, a promising second-generation cell type for cardiac repair. Biodegradable collagen scaffolds were seeded with human cardiopoietic stem cells, either as SCs or as 3D-MTs generated by using a modified hanging drop method. Thereafter, seeded scaffolds were placed on the CAM of living chicken embryos and analyzed for their perfusion capacity in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging assessment which was then linked to a longitudinal histomorphometric ex vivo analysis comprising blood vessel density and characteristics such as shape and size. Cellular self-assembly into 3D-MTs led to a significant increase of vessel density mainly driven by a higher number of neo-capillary formation. In contrast, SC-seeded scaffolds displayed a higher frequency of larger neo-vessels resulting in an overall 1.76-fold higher total vessel area (TVA). Importantly, despite that larger TVA in SC-seeded group, the mean perfusion capacity (MPC) was comparable between groups, therefore suggesting functional superiority together with an enhanced perfusion efficacy of the neo-vessels in 3D-MT-seeded scaffolds. This was further underlined by a 1.64-fold higher perfusion ratio when relating MPC to TVA. Our study shows that cellular self-assembly of human cardiopoietic stem cells into 3D-MTs substantially enhances their overall angiogenic potential and their functional neovascularization capacity. Hence, the concept of 3D-MTs may be considered to increase the therapeutic efficacy of future cell therapy concepts.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2019
Deposited On:11 Sep 2018 12:49
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:35
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0969-6970
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10456-018-9635-4
PubMed ID:30014173

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