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A Salutogenic Perspective on Adverse Experiences


Höltge, Jan; Mc Gee, Shauna L; Maercker, Andreas; Thoma, Myriam V (2018). A Salutogenic Perspective on Adverse Experiences. European Journal of Health Psychology, 25(2):53-69.

Abstract

Research has predominantly focused on the negative effects of adversity on health and well-being. However, the salutogenic perspective suggests that adversity may not always be detrimental (Antonovsky, 1996). In fact, under certain circumstances, adversity may have the potential for positive outcomes, such as increased resilience and thriving (Carver, 1998; Rutter, 1987). The “steeling effect” suggests that past experiences of adversity may increase resistance to later adversities. It proposes that moderate adversity may facilitate more adaptive functioning than no adversity or high levels of adversity (Rutter, 2006, 2012). The relationship between adversity and health may be optimally assessed using curvilinear models, yet the majority of previous studies have examined linear associations (Masten & Cicchetti, 2016). It is therefore the aim of this review to determine whether moderate adversity is associated with more adaptive functioning when compared to no and high levels of adversity. Practical implications and future research are also discussed.

Abstract

Research has predominantly focused on the negative effects of adversity on health and well-being. However, the salutogenic perspective suggests that adversity may not always be detrimental (Antonovsky, 1996). In fact, under certain circumstances, adversity may have the potential for positive outcomes, such as increased resilience and thriving (Carver, 1998; Rutter, 1987). The “steeling effect” suggests that past experiences of adversity may increase resistance to later adversities. It proposes that moderate adversity may facilitate more adaptive functioning than no adversity or high levels of adversity (Rutter, 2006, 2012). The relationship between adversity and health may be optimally assessed using curvilinear models, yet the majority of previous studies have examined linear associations (Masten & Cicchetti, 2016). It is therefore the aim of this review to determine whether moderate adversity is associated with more adaptive functioning when compared to no and high levels of adversity. Practical implications and future research are also discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:06 Sep 2018 10:17
Last Modified:06 Sep 2018 10:41
Publisher:Hogrefe Verlag
ISSN:2512-8442, 2512-8450
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1027/2512-8442/a000011

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