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Surgical Resection of a Reversed Palmaris Longus Muscle Causing Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome in a Competitive Swimmer: A Case Report


Getzmann, Jonas M; Schweizer, Andreas (2018). Surgical Resection of a Reversed Palmaris Longus Muscle Causing Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome in a Competitive Swimmer: A Case Report. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 6(5):2325967118769615.

Abstract

The palmaris longus is a superficial muscle located on the volar side of the forearm. It usually arises from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and inserts into the palmar aponeurosis of the wrist. However, the palmaris longus is one of the most variable muscles in the human body. The most frequent anatomic variation is complete agenesis, which is found in up to 25% of the population.9,12 Other variations include reversed, duplicated, bifid, or hypertrophied palmaris longus muscles, which can be of clinical significance by causing effort-related pain with or without median or ulnar nerve paresthesia.1,3,4,11 According to the literature, treatment of these conditions consists of excision of the anomalous muscle, decompressive fasciotomy, median or ulnar nerve release, or a combination of the aforementioned.3
We report a case in which a reversed palmaris longus muscle caused exertional forearm pain without median or ulnar nerve paresthesia in an adolescent competitive swimmer. Treatment consisted of surgical excision of the anomalous muscle, which led to full relief of pain.

Abstract

The palmaris longus is a superficial muscle located on the volar side of the forearm. It usually arises from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and inserts into the palmar aponeurosis of the wrist. However, the palmaris longus is one of the most variable muscles in the human body. The most frequent anatomic variation is complete agenesis, which is found in up to 25% of the population.9,12 Other variations include reversed, duplicated, bifid, or hypertrophied palmaris longus muscles, which can be of clinical significance by causing effort-related pain with or without median or ulnar nerve paresthesia.1,3,4,11 According to the literature, treatment of these conditions consists of excision of the anomalous muscle, decompressive fasciotomy, median or ulnar nerve release, or a combination of the aforementioned.3
We report a case in which a reversed palmaris longus muscle caused exertional forearm pain without median or ulnar nerve paresthesia in an adolescent competitive swimmer. Treatment consisted of surgical excision of the anomalous muscle, which led to full relief of pain.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2018
Deposited On:18 Sep 2018 14:07
Last Modified:01 Oct 2018 00:00
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:2325-9671
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/2325967118769615
PubMed ID:29881730

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