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Different acromial roof morphology in concentric and eccentric osteoarthritis of the shoulder: a multiplane reconstruction analysis of 105 shoulder computed tomography scans


Beeler, Silvan; Hasler, Anita; Götschi, Tobias; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian (2018). Different acromial roof morphology in concentric and eccentric osteoarthritis of the shoulder: a multiplane reconstruction analysis of 105 shoulder computed tomography scans. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 27(12):e357-e366.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The pathomechanisms of eccentric osteoarthritis of the shoulder remain unclear. Although there is increasing evidence of bony differences between shoulders with rotator cuff tears and osteoarthritis, analogous differences have not been identified for primary concentric and eccentric osteoarthritis. This study examined the shape and orientation of the acromial roof as a potential risk factor for the development of posterior glenoid wear.
METHODS We analyzed computed tomography images of 105 shoulders with primary osteoarthritis. Based on the classification of Walch, 45 shoulders had concentric osteoarthritis (Walch A) and 60 shoulders were affected by eccentric osteoarthritis (Walch B; EOA). A comparison of acromial morphology was performed in a multiplanar reconstruction analysis of computed tomography scans.
RESULTS Acromial shape: Acromial length, width, and area were not significantly different. Acromial roof orientation: The acromial roof in EOA was an average of 5° flatter (sagittal tilt; P < .01) and 5° more downward tilted (coronal tilt; P < .01). There was no difference in axial rotation (axial tilt; P = .47). Anteroposterior glenoid coverage: The glenoid in EOA was covered an average of 4° less posteriorly (P = .01) and 4° more anteriorly (P = .04). No differences were shown for overall glenoid coverage.
CONCLUSIONS The acromial roof could play a role in the pathogenesis of EOA. Less posterior support due to a flatter acromion with less posterior glenoid coverage could contribute to static posterior subluxation of the humeral head and posterior glenoid wear. Further biomechanical investigations are needed to confirm these findings.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The pathomechanisms of eccentric osteoarthritis of the shoulder remain unclear. Although there is increasing evidence of bony differences between shoulders with rotator cuff tears and osteoarthritis, analogous differences have not been identified for primary concentric and eccentric osteoarthritis. This study examined the shape and orientation of the acromial roof as a potential risk factor for the development of posterior glenoid wear.
METHODS We analyzed computed tomography images of 105 shoulders with primary osteoarthritis. Based on the classification of Walch, 45 shoulders had concentric osteoarthritis (Walch A) and 60 shoulders were affected by eccentric osteoarthritis (Walch B; EOA). A comparison of acromial morphology was performed in a multiplanar reconstruction analysis of computed tomography scans.
RESULTS Acromial shape: Acromial length, width, and area were not significantly different. Acromial roof orientation: The acromial roof in EOA was an average of 5° flatter (sagittal tilt; P < .01) and 5° more downward tilted (coronal tilt; P < .01). There was no difference in axial rotation (axial tilt; P = .47). Anteroposterior glenoid coverage: The glenoid in EOA was covered an average of 4° less posteriorly (P = .01) and 4° more anteriorly (P = .04). No differences were shown for overall glenoid coverage.
CONCLUSIONS The acromial roof could play a role in the pathogenesis of EOA. Less posterior support due to a flatter acromion with less posterior glenoid coverage could contribute to static posterior subluxation of the humeral head and posterior glenoid wear. Further biomechanical investigations are needed to confirm these findings.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 December 2018
Deposited On:19 Sep 2018 12:08
Last Modified:14 Nov 2018 02:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1058-2746
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2018.05.019
PubMed ID:30054240

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