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Deficiency of the first mannosylation step in the N-glycosylation pathway causes congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ik


Grubenmann, C E; Frank, C G; Hülsmeier, A J; Schollen, E; Matthijs, G; Mayatepek, E; Berger, E G; Aebi, M; Hennet, Thierry (2004). Deficiency of the first mannosylation step in the N-glycosylation pathway causes congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ik. Human Molecular Genetics, 13(5):535-542.

Abstract

Defects of N-linked glycosylation represent diseases with multiple organ involvements that are classified as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). In recent years, several CDG types have been attributed to defects of dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum. The profiling of [3H]mannose-labeled lipid-linked oligosaccharides was instrumental in identifying most of these glycosylation disorders. However, this method is poorly suited for the identification of short lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis defects. To adequately resolve deficiencies affecting the first steps of lipid-linked oligosaccharide formation, we have used a non-radioactive procedure employing the fluorescence detection of 2-aminobenzamide-coupled oligosaccharides after HPLC separation. By applying this method, we have detected the accumulation of dolichylpyrophosphate-GlcNAc2 in a previously untyped CDG patient. The accumulation pattern suggested a deficiency of the ALG1 β1,4 mannosyltransferase, which adds the first mannose residue to lipid-linked oligosaccharides. This was supported by the finding that this CDG patient was compound heterozygous for three mutations in the ALG1 gene, leading to the amino acid substitutions S150R and D429E on one allele and S258L on the other. The detrimental effect of these mutations on ALG1 protein function was demonstrated in a complementation assay using alg1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast mutants. The ALG1 mannosyltransferase defect described here represents a novel type of CDG, which should be referred to as CDG-Ik

Abstract

Defects of N-linked glycosylation represent diseases with multiple organ involvements that are classified as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). In recent years, several CDG types have been attributed to defects of dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum. The profiling of [3H]mannose-labeled lipid-linked oligosaccharides was instrumental in identifying most of these glycosylation disorders. However, this method is poorly suited for the identification of short lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis defects. To adequately resolve deficiencies affecting the first steps of lipid-linked oligosaccharide formation, we have used a non-radioactive procedure employing the fluorescence detection of 2-aminobenzamide-coupled oligosaccharides after HPLC separation. By applying this method, we have detected the accumulation of dolichylpyrophosphate-GlcNAc2 in a previously untyped CDG patient. The accumulation pattern suggested a deficiency of the ALG1 β1,4 mannosyltransferase, which adds the first mannose residue to lipid-linked oligosaccharides. This was supported by the finding that this CDG patient was compound heterozygous for three mutations in the ALG1 gene, leading to the amino acid substitutions S150R and D429E on one allele and S258L on the other. The detrimental effect of these mutations on ALG1 protein function was demonstrated in a complementation assay using alg1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast mutants. The ALG1 mannosyltransferase defect described here represents a novel type of CDG, which should be referred to as CDG-Ik

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Language:English
Date:6 January 2004
Deposited On:05 Oct 2018 12:48
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 14:47
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0964-6906
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddh050
PubMed ID:14709599

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