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Bronchoscopic radioisotope injection for sentinel lymph-node mapping in potentially resectable non-small-cell lung cancer


Lardinois, D; Brack, T; Gaspert, A; Spahr, T; Schneiter, D; Steinert, H C; Weder, W (2003). Bronchoscopic radioisotope injection for sentinel lymph-node mapping in potentially resectable non-small-cell lung cancer. European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 23(5):824-827.

Abstract

Objective: Prospective study to evaluate the feasibility of a preoperative bronchoscopic radioisotope application, followed by conventional sentinel lymph-node (SLN) identification and to investigate the occurrence and distribution of micrometastases in relation to SLN activity. Methods: Twenty patients with a mean age of 63 years and proven clinical stage T1-3 N0-1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included. A dosage of 80 MBq radiolabeled technetium-99m nanocolloid was endoscopically administrated on intubated patients in the operation theatre. At thoracotomy, scintigraphic readings of both the primary tumor and hilar and mediastinal lymph-node stations were obtained with a hand-held gamma-counter. Patients underwent lung resection and mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Radiolabeled nodes were also examined separately on back-table. SLNs were defined as the hottest nodes or nodes with at least one-tenth of the radioactivity of the hottest nodes. SLNs pathologic assessment included standard examination using hematoxylin and eosin staining on step sections and immunohistochemistry (ICH) for cytokeratins. Results: Identification of SLNs was possible in 19/20 (95%) patients after bronchoscopic radioisotope application. In 7/19 (37%) patients, a unique SLN was identified, whereas in 12/19 (63%) patients, nodes from two different stations could be classified as SLNs. Metastatic nodal disease was found in 9/19 (47%) patients. ICH revealed micrometastases in 2/12 (17%) patients, initially classified nodal negative. Pathologic negative SLNs were a predictor for absence of metastatic nodal disease after mediastinal lymphadenectomy. No complication related to the procedure was observed. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that preoperative bronchoscopic radioisotope injection for SLN identification is a safe and simple method, improving accuracy of SLN detection in comparison to intraoperative technique. The absence of metastases in the SLNs seems to predict a negative nodal status accurately

Abstract

Objective: Prospective study to evaluate the feasibility of a preoperative bronchoscopic radioisotope application, followed by conventional sentinel lymph-node (SLN) identification and to investigate the occurrence and distribution of micrometastases in relation to SLN activity. Methods: Twenty patients with a mean age of 63 years and proven clinical stage T1-3 N0-1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included. A dosage of 80 MBq radiolabeled technetium-99m nanocolloid was endoscopically administrated on intubated patients in the operation theatre. At thoracotomy, scintigraphic readings of both the primary tumor and hilar and mediastinal lymph-node stations were obtained with a hand-held gamma-counter. Patients underwent lung resection and mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Radiolabeled nodes were also examined separately on back-table. SLNs were defined as the hottest nodes or nodes with at least one-tenth of the radioactivity of the hottest nodes. SLNs pathologic assessment included standard examination using hematoxylin and eosin staining on step sections and immunohistochemistry (ICH) for cytokeratins. Results: Identification of SLNs was possible in 19/20 (95%) patients after bronchoscopic radioisotope application. In 7/19 (37%) patients, a unique SLN was identified, whereas in 12/19 (63%) patients, nodes from two different stations could be classified as SLNs. Metastatic nodal disease was found in 9/19 (47%) patients. ICH revealed micrometastases in 2/12 (17%) patients, initially classified nodal negative. Pathologic negative SLNs were a predictor for absence of metastatic nodal disease after mediastinal lymphadenectomy. No complication related to the procedure was observed. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that preoperative bronchoscopic radioisotope injection for SLN identification is a safe and simple method, improving accuracy of SLN detection in comparison to intraoperative technique. The absence of metastases in the SLNs seems to predict a negative nodal status accurately

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 May 2003
Deposited On:05 Oct 2018 16:12
Last Modified:26 Apr 2019 07:25
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1010-7940
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/s1010-7940(03)00077-0
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101016S1010794003000770 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:12754040

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