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Weak lensing by galaxies in groups and clusters – I. Theoretical expectations


Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H J; Van Den Bosch, Frank C; Jing, Y P; Weinmann, Simone M; Meneghetti, M (2006). Weak lensing by galaxies in groups and clusters – I. Theoretical expectations. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 373(3):1159-1172.

Abstract

Galaxy-galaxy lensing is rapidly becoming one of the most promising means to accurately measure the average relation between galaxy properties and halo mass. In order to obtain a signal of sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, one needs to stack many lens galaxies according to their property of interest, such as luminosity or stellar mass. Since such a stack consists of both central and satellite galaxies, which contribute very different lensing signals, the resulting shear measurements can be difficult to interpret. In the past, galaxy-galaxy lensing studies either have completely ignored this problem, have applied rough isolation criteria in an attempt to preferentially select ‘central' galaxies, or have tried to model the contribution of satellites explicitly. However, if one is able to a priori split the galaxy population in central and satellite galaxies, one can measure their lensing signals separately. This not only allows a much cleaner measurement of the relation between halo mass and their galaxy populations, but also allows a direct measurement of the subhalo masses around satellite galaxies. In this paper, we use a realistic mock galaxy redshift survey to show that galaxy groups, properly selected from large galaxy surveys, can be used to accurately split the galaxy population in centrals and satellites. Stacking the resulting centrals according to their group mass, estimated from the total group luminosity, allows a remarkably accurate recovery of the masses and density profiles of their host haloes. In addition, stacking the corresponding satellite galaxies according to their projected distance from the group centre yields a lensing signal that can be used to accurate measure the masses of both subhaloes and host haloes. We conclude that an application of galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements to group catalogues extracted from large galaxy redshift surveys offers a unique opportunity to accurately constrain the galaxy-dark matter connection

Abstract

Galaxy-galaxy lensing is rapidly becoming one of the most promising means to accurately measure the average relation between galaxy properties and halo mass. In order to obtain a signal of sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, one needs to stack many lens galaxies according to their property of interest, such as luminosity or stellar mass. Since such a stack consists of both central and satellite galaxies, which contribute very different lensing signals, the resulting shear measurements can be difficult to interpret. In the past, galaxy-galaxy lensing studies either have completely ignored this problem, have applied rough isolation criteria in an attempt to preferentially select ‘central' galaxies, or have tried to model the contribution of satellites explicitly. However, if one is able to a priori split the galaxy population in central and satellite galaxies, one can measure their lensing signals separately. This not only allows a much cleaner measurement of the relation between halo mass and their galaxy populations, but also allows a direct measurement of the subhalo masses around satellite galaxies. In this paper, we use a realistic mock galaxy redshift survey to show that galaxy groups, properly selected from large galaxy surveys, can be used to accurately split the galaxy population in centrals and satellites. Stacking the resulting centrals according to their group mass, estimated from the total group luminosity, allows a remarkably accurate recovery of the masses and density profiles of their host haloes. In addition, stacking the corresponding satellite galaxies according to their projected distance from the group centre yields a lensing signal that can be used to accurate measure the masses of both subhaloes and host haloes. We conclude that an application of galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements to group catalogues extracted from large galaxy redshift surveys offers a unique opportunity to accurately constrain the galaxy-dark matter connection

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Astronomy and Astrophysics
Physical Sciences > Space and Planetary Science
Language:English
Date:1 December 2006
Deposited On:17 Oct 2018 14:24
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:00
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0035-8711
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2006.11091.x
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101111j13652966200611091x (Library Catalogue)

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