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Three Consecutive Outbreaks of Serratia marcescens in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit


Fleisch, Felix; Zimmermann-Baer, Urs; Zbinden, Reinhard; Bischoff, Gian; Arlettaz, Romaine; Waldvogel, Katharina; Nadal, David; Christian, Ruef (2002). Three Consecutive Outbreaks of Serratia marcescens in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 34(6):767-773.

Abstract

We investigated an outbreak of Serratia marcescens in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the University Hospital of Zurich. S. marcescens infection was detected in 4 children transferred from the NICU to the University Children's Hospital (Zurich). All isolates showed identical banding patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In a prevalence survey, 11 of 20 neonates were found to be colonized. S. marcescens was isolated from bottles of liquid theophylline. Despite replacement of these bottles, S. marcescens colonization was detected in additional patients. Prospective collection of stool and gastric aspirate specimens revealed that colonization occurred in some babies within 24 hours after delivery. These isolates showed a different genotype. Cultures of milk from used milk bottles yielded S. marcescens. These isolates showed a third genotype. The method of reprocessing bottles was changed to thermal disinfection. In follow-up prevalence studies, 0 of 29 neonates were found to be colonized by S. marcescens. In summary, 3 consecutive outbreaks caused by 3 genetically unrelated clones of S. marcescens could be documented. Contaminated milk could be identified as the source of at least the third outbreak

Abstract

We investigated an outbreak of Serratia marcescens in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the University Hospital of Zurich. S. marcescens infection was detected in 4 children transferred from the NICU to the University Children's Hospital (Zurich). All isolates showed identical banding patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In a prevalence survey, 11 of 20 neonates were found to be colonized. S. marcescens was isolated from bottles of liquid theophylline. Despite replacement of these bottles, S. marcescens colonization was detected in additional patients. Prospective collection of stool and gastric aspirate specimens revealed that colonization occurred in some babies within 24 hours after delivery. These isolates showed a different genotype. Cultures of milk from used milk bottles yielded S. marcescens. These isolates showed a third genotype. The method of reprocessing bottles was changed to thermal disinfection. In follow-up prevalence studies, 0 of 29 neonates were found to be colonized by S. marcescens. In summary, 3 consecutive outbreaks caused by 3 genetically unrelated clones of S. marcescens could be documented. Contaminated milk could be identified as the source of at least the third outbreak

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 March 2002
Deposited On:25 Sep 2018 10:30
Last Modified:24 Nov 2018 02:56
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1058-4838
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/339046
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101086339046 (Library Catalogue)

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