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Are low tolerable upper intake levels for vitamin A undermining effective food fortification efforts?


Kraemer, Klaus; Waelti, Monika; De Pee, Saskia; Moench-Pfanner, Regina; Hathcock, John N; Bloem, Martin W; Semba, Richard D (2008). Are low tolerable upper intake levels for vitamin A undermining effective food fortification efforts? Nutrition Reviews, 66(9):517-525.

Abstract

Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is a major health problem, particularly in low-resource countries, putting an estimated 125-130 million preschool-aged children at increased risk of morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. Vitamin A supplementation reduces VAD and increases child survival; it is complemented by fortifying foods with vitamin A. Concern over increased risk of bone fracture associated with vitamin A intakes below the tolerable upper intake level (UL) among populations in affluent countries conflicts with the need to increase intakes in less developed countries, where populations are at greater risk of VAD and intakes are unlikely to reach the UL as diets include fewer foods containing retinol while vitamin A from carotenoids poses no risk of overdose. With the implementation of recently developed risk management tools, vitamin A can be used safely in food fortification, including point-of-use fortification in the context of supplementation among specific target groups in low-resource countries

Abstract

Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is a major health problem, particularly in low-resource countries, putting an estimated 125-130 million preschool-aged children at increased risk of morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. Vitamin A supplementation reduces VAD and increases child survival; it is complemented by fortifying foods with vitamin A. Concern over increased risk of bone fracture associated with vitamin A intakes below the tolerable upper intake level (UL) among populations in affluent countries conflicts with the need to increase intakes in less developed countries, where populations are at greater risk of VAD and intakes are unlikely to reach the UL as diets include fewer foods containing retinol while vitamin A from carotenoids poses no risk of overdose. With the implementation of recently developed risk management tools, vitamin A can be used safely in food fortification, including point-of-use fortification in the context of supplementation among specific target groups in low-resource countries

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:22 August 2008
Deposited On:23 Oct 2018 18:09
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:39
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0029-6643
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2008.00084.x
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101111j17534887200800084x (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:18752475

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