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Left ventricular assist device as bridge to heart transplantation – lessons learned with the MicroMed DeBakey axial blood flow pump


Salzberg, S (2003). Left ventricular assist device as bridge to heart transplantation – lessons learned with the MicroMed DeBakey axial blood flow pump. European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 24(1):113-118.

Abstract

Objective: The MicroMed DeBakey left ventricular assist device (LVAD) axial blood flow pump was used as bridge to heart transplantation (HTx) in patients with terminal heart failure. The aim was to evaluate this novel mechanical circulatory support system in regard to overall outcome. Methods: Prospective study in 15 HTx candidates (mean age 40±7 years) with terminal heart failure and maximal medical treatment due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP, n=5), dilated CMP (n=3), restrictive CMP (n=2), unclassified CMP (n=1), metabolic CMP (n=1), valvular CMP (n=1) and congenital CMP (n=2). All patients were implanted with a MicroMed DeBakey LVAD. A rescue procedure was necessary in eight critical patients, while seven underwent elective LVAD implantation. Procedures were performed via median sternotomy, in normotherm femoro-femoral CPB (mean duration 59±1 min). Oral Marcoumar© (INR 2.0-3.0) and Aspirin© (100 mg daily) were started as soon as possible. Patients were discharged into a specialized rehabilitation clinic from which it was possible to release them home after a few weeks. Results: Successful implantation and discharge from ICU (mean stay 10±7 days) was possible in 11 patients. Seven were transplanted (mean support 50.7 days) and one is awaiting HTx (support >310 days) in the comfort of his home (NYHA I). Survival was 100% among the transplanted patients. Of the seven elective implants, five, and of the eight rescue procedures three patients underwent successful HTx. Four patients died early, while three patients died late on pump support due to intracranial hemorrhage (n=2, 73 and 76 days) and chest infection (n=1, 124 days). All survivors were discharged from hospital, with significant decrease in NYHA class (mean 3.8-2.4 (n=11)). Treadmill testing showed increased exercise tolerance, from 35 to 71 W (n=4). Plasma BNP values (mean 950-162 ng/l (n=4)) and pulmonary resistance (mean 316-194.5 dyne s/cm5 (n=3)) decreased significantly during LVAD support. Conclusions: The MicroMed DeBakey LVAD is simple to implant; outpatient treatment is safe and efficient. Patients' condition and pulmonary resistances normalize within 6 weeks, making previously considered inoperable patients amenable for HTx. HTx can be performed in low-risk situation, allowing better donor-recipient matching and improving overall outcome

Abstract

Objective: The MicroMed DeBakey left ventricular assist device (LVAD) axial blood flow pump was used as bridge to heart transplantation (HTx) in patients with terminal heart failure. The aim was to evaluate this novel mechanical circulatory support system in regard to overall outcome. Methods: Prospective study in 15 HTx candidates (mean age 40±7 years) with terminal heart failure and maximal medical treatment due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP, n=5), dilated CMP (n=3), restrictive CMP (n=2), unclassified CMP (n=1), metabolic CMP (n=1), valvular CMP (n=1) and congenital CMP (n=2). All patients were implanted with a MicroMed DeBakey LVAD. A rescue procedure was necessary in eight critical patients, while seven underwent elective LVAD implantation. Procedures were performed via median sternotomy, in normotherm femoro-femoral CPB (mean duration 59±1 min). Oral Marcoumar© (INR 2.0-3.0) and Aspirin© (100 mg daily) were started as soon as possible. Patients were discharged into a specialized rehabilitation clinic from which it was possible to release them home after a few weeks. Results: Successful implantation and discharge from ICU (mean stay 10±7 days) was possible in 11 patients. Seven were transplanted (mean support 50.7 days) and one is awaiting HTx (support >310 days) in the comfort of his home (NYHA I). Survival was 100% among the transplanted patients. Of the seven elective implants, five, and of the eight rescue procedures three patients underwent successful HTx. Four patients died early, while three patients died late on pump support due to intracranial hemorrhage (n=2, 73 and 76 days) and chest infection (n=1, 124 days). All survivors were discharged from hospital, with significant decrease in NYHA class (mean 3.8-2.4 (n=11)). Treadmill testing showed increased exercise tolerance, from 35 to 71 W (n=4). Plasma BNP values (mean 950-162 ng/l (n=4)) and pulmonary resistance (mean 316-194.5 dyne s/cm5 (n=3)) decreased significantly during LVAD support. Conclusions: The MicroMed DeBakey LVAD is simple to implant; outpatient treatment is safe and efficient. Patients' condition and pulmonary resistances normalize within 6 weeks, making previously considered inoperable patients amenable for HTx. HTx can be performed in low-risk situation, allowing better donor-recipient matching and improving overall outcome

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
Health Sciences > Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 July 2003
Deposited On:10 Oct 2018 10:57
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 14:48
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1010-7940
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/s1010-7940(03)00179-9

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