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Dark matter versus modifications of the gravitational inverse-square law: results from planetary motion in the Solar system


Sereno, M; Jetzer, P (2006). Dark matter versus modifications of the gravitational inverse-square law: results from planetary motion in the Solar system. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 371(2):626-632.

Abstract

Dark matter or modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law in the Solar system are studied with accurate planetary astrometric data. From extraperihelion precession and possible changes in the third Kepler's law, we get an upper limit on the local dark matter density, ρDM≲ 3 × 10−16 kg m−3 at the 2σ confidence level. Variations in the 1/r2 behaviour are considered in the form of either a possible Yukawa-like interaction or a modification of gravity of Milgrom's modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) type. Up to scales of 1011 m, scale-dependent deviations in the gravitational acceleration are really small. We examined the MOND interpolating function μ in the regime of strong gravity. Gradually varying μ suggested by fits of rotation curves are excluded, whereas the standard form μ(x) =x/(1 +x2)1/2 is still compatible with data. In combination with constraints from galactic rotation curves and theoretical considerations on the external field effect, the absence of any significant deviation from inverse square attraction in the Solar system makes the range of acceptable interpolating functions significantly narrow. Future radio ranging observations of outer planets with an accuracy of few tenths of a metre could either give positive evidence of dark matter or disprove modifications of gravity

Abstract

Dark matter or modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law in the Solar system are studied with accurate planetary astrometric data. From extraperihelion precession and possible changes in the third Kepler's law, we get an upper limit on the local dark matter density, ρDM≲ 3 × 10−16 kg m−3 at the 2σ confidence level. Variations in the 1/r2 behaviour are considered in the form of either a possible Yukawa-like interaction or a modification of gravity of Milgrom's modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) type. Up to scales of 1011 m, scale-dependent deviations in the gravitational acceleration are really small. We examined the MOND interpolating function μ in the regime of strong gravity. Gradually varying μ suggested by fits of rotation curves are excluded, whereas the standard form μ(x) =x/(1 +x2)1/2 is still compatible with data. In combination with constraints from galactic rotation curves and theoretical considerations on the external field effect, the absence of any significant deviation from inverse square attraction in the Solar system makes the range of acceptable interpolating functions significantly narrow. Future radio ranging observations of outer planets with an accuracy of few tenths of a metre could either give positive evidence of dark matter or disprove modifications of gravity

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:11 September 2006
Deposited On:24 Oct 2018 15:43
Last Modified:24 Nov 2018 02:57
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0035-8711
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2006.10670.x
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101111j13652966200610670x (Library Catalogue)

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