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Simulations of gaseous disc-embedded planet interaction


Lufkin, G; Quinn, T; Wadsley, J; Stadel, J; Governato, F (2004). Simulations of gaseous disc-embedded planet interaction. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 347(2):421-429.

Abstract

We present global three-dimensional self-gravitating smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of an isothermal gaseous disc interacting with an embedded planet. Discs of varying stability are simulated with planets ranging from 10 Earth masses to 2 Jupiter masses. The SPH technique provides the large dynamic range needed to accurately capture the large-scale behaviour of the disc and the small-scale interaction of the planet with surrounding material. Most runs used 105 gas particles, giving us the spatial resolution required to observe the formation of planets. We find four regions in parameter space: low-mass planets undergo type I migration; higher-mass planets can form a gap; the gravitational instability mode of planet formation in marginally stable discs can be triggered by embedded planets; discs that are completely unstable can fragment to form many planets. The disc stability is the most important factor in determining which interaction a system will exhibit. For the stable disc cases, our migration and accretion time-scales are shorter and scale differently from previously suggested

Abstract

We present global three-dimensional self-gravitating smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of an isothermal gaseous disc interacting with an embedded planet. Discs of varying stability are simulated with planets ranging from 10 Earth masses to 2 Jupiter masses. The SPH technique provides the large dynamic range needed to accurately capture the large-scale behaviour of the disc and the small-scale interaction of the planet with surrounding material. Most runs used 105 gas particles, giving us the spatial resolution required to observe the formation of planets. We find four regions in parameter space: low-mass planets undergo type I migration; higher-mass planets can form a gap; the gravitational instability mode of planet formation in marginally stable discs can be triggered by embedded planets; discs that are completely unstable can fragment to form many planets. The disc stability is the most important factor in determining which interaction a system will exhibit. For the stable disc cases, our migration and accretion time-scales are shorter and scale differently from previously suggested

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Astronomy and Astrophysics
Physical Sciences > Space and Planetary Science
Language:English
Date:11 January 2004
Deposited On:19 Oct 2018 06:15
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:07
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0035-8711
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2004.07208.x
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101111j13652966200407208x (Library Catalogue)

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