Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Long-term subcutaneous morphine administration after surgery in newborns


Rouss, Kerstin; Gerber, Andreas; Albisetti, Manuela; Hug, Maja; Bernet, Vera (2007). Long-term subcutaneous morphine administration after surgery in newborns. Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 35(1):79-81.

Abstract

Aim: To analyze the management of newborns after major surgery receiving morphine subcutaneously and to identify possible side effects. Methods: Morphine was administered via a subcutaneous catheter (Insuflon®) in 20 newborns after major surgery. Side effects like hypotension, pain during morphine administration and local infection were noted. Morphine dose was adjusted according to the hospital guidelines with the Neonatal Infant Pain Score (NIPS) and the Finnegan withdrawal score. Results: Surgery was performed at the median age of 38 5/7weeks (range: 32 1/7-49 5/7weeks). Before starting subcutaneous morphine administration, patients received intravenous morphine for a median of two weeks (range sixdays to sevenweeks). All patients showed good pain relief with no severe side effects. Three patients reacted with crying to the first dose of subcutaneous morphine. No other side effects occurred. Conclusion: Subcutaneous application of morphine with the Insuflon® catheter is an alternative to intravenous treatment of postoperative pain in neonates. In this small group pain relief was good and side effects were harmless

Abstract

Aim: To analyze the management of newborns after major surgery receiving morphine subcutaneously and to identify possible side effects. Methods: Morphine was administered via a subcutaneous catheter (Insuflon®) in 20 newborns after major surgery. Side effects like hypotension, pain during morphine administration and local infection were noted. Morphine dose was adjusted according to the hospital guidelines with the Neonatal Infant Pain Score (NIPS) and the Finnegan withdrawal score. Results: Surgery was performed at the median age of 38 5/7weeks (range: 32 1/7-49 5/7weeks). Before starting subcutaneous morphine administration, patients received intravenous morphine for a median of two weeks (range sixdays to sevenweeks). All patients showed good pain relief with no severe side effects. Three patients reacted with crying to the first dose of subcutaneous morphine. No other side effects occurred. Conclusion: Subcutaneous application of morphine with the Insuflon® catheter is an alternative to intravenous treatment of postoperative pain in neonates. In this small group pain relief was good and side effects were harmless

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
6 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

20 downloads since deposited on 26 Oct 2018
20 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 2007
Deposited On:26 Oct 2018 16:53
Last Modified:27 Oct 2018 12:40
Publisher:De Gruyter
ISSN:0300-5577
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm.2007.013
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicencegruyter101515JPM2007013 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:17313316

Download

Download PDF  'Long-term subcutaneous morphine administration after surgery in newborns'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 48kB
View at publisher