Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Anthracycline-induced acute cardiotoxicity in adults treated for leukaemia


Dazzi, H; Kaufmann, K; Follath, F (2001). Anthracycline-induced acute cardiotoxicity in adults treated for leukaemia. Annals of Oncology, 12(7):963-966.

Abstract

Background: Acute cardiotoxicity due to anthracyclines is a rare, but life-threatening event. Interindividual sensitivity to anthracyclines is highly variable and cannot be predicted for the individual patient. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study. Medical charts and autopsy report of patients treated for acute leuke mia between 1990 and 1996 at the University Hospital of Zürich, Switzerland were reviewed and searched for anthracycline-associated acute cardiotoxicity. Patients with pre-existing heart disease known to be associated with cardiotoxicity were excluded. Results: Seven patients treated for leukemia with proven anthracycline-associated acute cardiotoxicity were included. In six patients the direct cause of death was acute cardiotoxicity due to the treatment. One patient recovered from cardiac failure but died a few months later from refractory leukemia. Clinical symptoms were those of a heart failure. Pathological findings were dilatative cardiac hypertrophy and pericardial effusion. Microscopically the typical findings of myocardial fibrosis and perinuclear vacuolisated myocytes were seen. Conclusions: The awareness of acute adverse effects on cardiac performance by anthracyclines faciliates early recognition and prevention of heart failure. Reliable tests are needed for the early diagnosis of subclinical myocardial damage in order to identify patients at risk

Abstract

Background: Acute cardiotoxicity due to anthracyclines is a rare, but life-threatening event. Interindividual sensitivity to anthracyclines is highly variable and cannot be predicted for the individual patient. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study. Medical charts and autopsy report of patients treated for acute leuke mia between 1990 and 1996 at the University Hospital of Zürich, Switzerland were reviewed and searched for anthracycline-associated acute cardiotoxicity. Patients with pre-existing heart disease known to be associated with cardiotoxicity were excluded. Results: Seven patients treated for leukemia with proven anthracycline-associated acute cardiotoxicity were included. In six patients the direct cause of death was acute cardiotoxicity due to the treatment. One patient recovered from cardiac failure but died a few months later from refractory leukemia. Clinical symptoms were those of a heart failure. Pathological findings were dilatative cardiac hypertrophy and pericardial effusion. Microscopically the typical findings of myocardial fibrosis and perinuclear vacuolisated myocytes were seen. Conclusions: The awareness of acute adverse effects on cardiac performance by anthracyclines faciliates early recognition and prevention of heart failure. Reliable tests are needed for the early diagnosis of subclinical myocardial damage in order to identify patients at risk

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
31 citations in Web of Science®
41 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

17 downloads since deposited on 25 Sep 2018
17 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 July 2001
Deposited On:25 Sep 2018 13:05
Last Modified:26 Apr 2019 19:31
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0923-7534
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1011196910325
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101023A1011196910325 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Download PDF  'Anthracycline-induced acute cardiotoxicity in adults treated for leukaemia'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 365kB
View at publisher