Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

A prospective controlled study of low back school in the general population


Weber, M; Cedraschi, C; Roux, E; Kissling, R O; von Kanel, S; Dalvit, G (1996). A prospective controlled study of low back school in the general population. Rheumatology, 35(2):178-183.

Abstract

There are no data on the efficacy of a back school in primary prevention of back pain in the general population or on the characteristics of the population who volunteers. After announcement in the local press, 494 healthy adults volunteered and paid for a back school course in Switzerland. A total of 371 controls were matched for sex, age, profession, nationality and back pain. A statistically significant decrease in numbers of doctor's visits was found by the participants during the following 6 months compared with the controls. However, there were no significant between-group differences in the four remaining parameters (presence and intensity of back pain, drug intake and sick leave). Three-quarters of participants changed their attitudes after the back school. Volunteering for a back pain prevention programme was associated with the presence of back pain problems. Reasons for volunteering are further discussed. Overall, the results of this study showed that a back school for the general population may not solve the problem of low back pain, but improves self-help in a subgroup of the population

Abstract

There are no data on the efficacy of a back school in primary prevention of back pain in the general population or on the characteristics of the population who volunteers. After announcement in the local press, 494 healthy adults volunteered and paid for a back school course in Switzerland. A total of 371 controls were matched for sex, age, profession, nationality and back pain. A statistically significant decrease in numbers of doctor's visits was found by the participants during the following 6 months compared with the controls. However, there were no significant between-group differences in the four remaining parameters (presence and intensity of back pain, drug intake and sick leave). Three-quarters of participants changed their attitudes after the back school. Volunteering for a back pain prevention programme was associated with the presence of back pain problems. Reasons for volunteering are further discussed. Overall, the results of this study showed that a back school for the general population may not solve the problem of low back pain, but improves self-help in a subgroup of the population

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 11 Oct 2018
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 1996
Deposited On:11 Oct 2018 14:05
Last Modified:11 Oct 2018 14:07
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1462-0324
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/35.2.178
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101093rheumatology352178 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Download PDF  'A prospective controlled study of low back school in the general population'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 578kB
View at publisher