Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The Fundamental Relevance of Morphology and Morphogenesis to Plant Research


Sattler, R (1997). The Fundamental Relevance of Morphology and Morphogenesis to Plant Research. Annals of Botany, 80(5):571-582.

Abstract

Plant morphology, including morphogenesis, remains relevant to practically all disciplines of plant biology such as molecular genetics, physiology, ecology, evolutionary biology and systematics. This relevance derives from the fact that other disciplines refer to or imply morphological concepts, conceptual frameworks of morphology, and morphological theories. Most commonly, morphology is equated with classical morphology and its conceptual framework. According to this, flowering plants and certain other taxa are reduced to the mutually exclusive categories of root, stem (caulome) and leaf (phyllome). This ignores the fact that plant morphology has undergone fundamental conceptual, theoretical and philosophical innovation in recent times. These changes, when recognized, can fundamentally affect research in various disciplines of plant biology. They may even change the questions that are asked and thus may affect the direction of future research. If, for example, plant diversity and evolution are seen as a dynamic continuum, then compound leaves can be seen as intermediate between simple leaves and whole shoots. Recent results in molecular genetics support this view. Phylogenetically, this could mean that compound leaves are the result of developmental hybridization, i.e. partial homeosis. Many other examples are given to illustrate the relevance and potential impact of basic conceptual and theoretical innovations in plant morphology.Copyright 1997 Annals of Botany Company

Abstract

Plant morphology, including morphogenesis, remains relevant to practically all disciplines of plant biology such as molecular genetics, physiology, ecology, evolutionary biology and systematics. This relevance derives from the fact that other disciplines refer to or imply morphological concepts, conceptual frameworks of morphology, and morphological theories. Most commonly, morphology is equated with classical morphology and its conceptual framework. According to this, flowering plants and certain other taxa are reduced to the mutually exclusive categories of root, stem (caulome) and leaf (phyllome). This ignores the fact that plant morphology has undergone fundamental conceptual, theoretical and philosophical innovation in recent times. These changes, when recognized, can fundamentally affect research in various disciplines of plant biology. They may even change the questions that are asked and thus may affect the direction of future research. If, for example, plant diversity and evolution are seen as a dynamic continuum, then compound leaves can be seen as intermediate between simple leaves and whole shoots. Recent results in molecular genetics support this view. Phylogenetically, this could mean that compound leaves are the result of developmental hybridization, i.e. partial homeosis. Many other examples are given to illustrate the relevance and potential impact of basic conceptual and theoretical innovations in plant morphology.Copyright 1997 Annals of Botany Company

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
59 citations in Web of Science®
65 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

15 downloads since deposited on 25 Sep 2018
9 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Plant Science
Language:English
Date:1 November 1997
Deposited On:25 Sep 2018 13:12
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:13
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0305-7364
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1006/anbo.1997.0474
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101006anbo19970474 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Hybrid Open Access

Download PDF  'The Fundamental Relevance of Morphology and Morphogenesis to Plant Research'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 209kB
View at publisher