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Mechanisms of vascular damage in SSc--implications for vascular treatment strategies


Guiducci, S; Distler, O; Distler, J H W; Matucci-Cerinic, M (2008). Mechanisms of vascular damage in SSc--implications for vascular treatment strategies. Rheumatology, 47(Supplement):v18-v20.

Abstract

Vascular abnormalities are a major component of SSc, but little is known about the events or mechanisms that initiate vascular injury and prevent its repair. In SSc, angiogenesis is incomplete or lacking despite the increased expression of a large array of pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF. Conflicting results have recently been published concerning the presence and role of vasculogenesis and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in SSc. It remains to be established if these endothelial progenitor cells are a marker of endothelial disease or a cause of insufficient vascular repair. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an alternative source for endothelial progenitor cells, and it has been observed that the angiogenic potential of endothelial-like MSCs is reduced. Other mechanisms of vascular damage include oxidative stress and factors released from activated platelets. In addition, growth factors such as ET-1 and PDGF induce proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells resulting in intimal thickening. For the development of new therapeutic strategies, it is important to realize that the different vascular pathologies—uncompensated loss of capillaries on one hand and vascular remodelling with a proliferative vasculopathy on the other—might require different treatment approaches

Abstract

Vascular abnormalities are a major component of SSc, but little is known about the events or mechanisms that initiate vascular injury and prevent its repair. In SSc, angiogenesis is incomplete or lacking despite the increased expression of a large array of pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF. Conflicting results have recently been published concerning the presence and role of vasculogenesis and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in SSc. It remains to be established if these endothelial progenitor cells are a marker of endothelial disease or a cause of insufficient vascular repair. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an alternative source for endothelial progenitor cells, and it has been observed that the angiogenic potential of endothelial-like MSCs is reduced. Other mechanisms of vascular damage include oxidative stress and factors released from activated platelets. In addition, growth factors such as ET-1 and PDGF induce proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells resulting in intimal thickening. For the development of new therapeutic strategies, it is important to realize that the different vascular pathologies—uncompensated loss of capillaries on one hand and vascular remodelling with a proliferative vasculopathy on the other—might require different treatment approaches

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Rheumatology
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:1 October 2008
Deposited On:08 Nov 2018 16:08
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:20
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1462-0324
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/ken267
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101093rheumatologyken267 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:18784130

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