Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Human umbilical cord cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering: a comparative study


Kadner, A; Zund, G; Maurus, C; Breymann, C; Yakarisik, S; Kadner, G; Turina, M; Hoerstrup, S (2004). Human umbilical cord cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering: a comparative study. European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 25(4):635-641.

Abstract

Objective: Tissue engineering of viable, autologous cardiovascular replacements with the potential to grow, repair and remodel represents an attractive approach to overcome the shortcomings of available replacements for the repair of congenital cardiac defects. Currently, vascular myofibroblast cells represent an established cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Cell isolation requires the invasive harvesting of venous or arterial vessel segments prior to scaffold seeding, a technique which may not be preferable, especially in pediatric patients. This study evaluates cells isolated from human umbilical cord artery, umbilical cord vein and whole cord as alternative autologous cell sources for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Methods: Cells were isolated from human umbilical cord artery (UCA), umbilical cord vein (UCV), whole umbilical cord (UCC) and saphenous vein segments (VC), and were expanded in culture. All three expanded cell groups were seeded on bioabsorbable copolymer strips and grown in vitro for 28 days. Isolated cells were characterized by flow cytometry, histology, immunohistochemistry, proliferation assays and compared to VC. Morphological analysis of the seeded polymer strips included histology, immunohistochemistry, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and uniaxial stress testing. Results: UCA, UCV and UCC demonstrated excellent cell growth properties comparable to VC. Following isolation, all three cell groups showed myofibroblast-like morphology and characteristics by staining positive for α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) and vimentin. Histology and immunohistochemistry of seeded polymers showed good tissue and extracellular matrix formation containing collagen I, III and elastin. TEM showed viable myofibroblasts and the deposition of collagen fibrils and progessive growing tissue formation, with a confluent surface, was observed in SEM. No difference was found among the mechanical properties of UCA, UCV, UCC and VC tissue engineered constructs. Conclusions: Tissue engineering of cardiovascular constructs by using UCA, UCV and UCC is feasible in an in vitro environment. Cell growth, morphology, characteristics and tissue formation were comparable between UCA, UCV, UCC and VC. UCC represent an attractive, readily available autologous cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering offering the additional benefits of utilizing juvenile cells and avoiding the invasive harvesting of intact vascular structures

Abstract

Objective: Tissue engineering of viable, autologous cardiovascular replacements with the potential to grow, repair and remodel represents an attractive approach to overcome the shortcomings of available replacements for the repair of congenital cardiac defects. Currently, vascular myofibroblast cells represent an established cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Cell isolation requires the invasive harvesting of venous or arterial vessel segments prior to scaffold seeding, a technique which may not be preferable, especially in pediatric patients. This study evaluates cells isolated from human umbilical cord artery, umbilical cord vein and whole cord as alternative autologous cell sources for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Methods: Cells were isolated from human umbilical cord artery (UCA), umbilical cord vein (UCV), whole umbilical cord (UCC) and saphenous vein segments (VC), and were expanded in culture. All three expanded cell groups were seeded on bioabsorbable copolymer strips and grown in vitro for 28 days. Isolated cells were characterized by flow cytometry, histology, immunohistochemistry, proliferation assays and compared to VC. Morphological analysis of the seeded polymer strips included histology, immunohistochemistry, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and uniaxial stress testing. Results: UCA, UCV and UCC demonstrated excellent cell growth properties comparable to VC. Following isolation, all three cell groups showed myofibroblast-like morphology and characteristics by staining positive for α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) and vimentin. Histology and immunohistochemistry of seeded polymers showed good tissue and extracellular matrix formation containing collagen I, III and elastin. TEM showed viable myofibroblasts and the deposition of collagen fibrils and progessive growing tissue formation, with a confluent surface, was observed in SEM. No difference was found among the mechanical properties of UCA, UCV, UCC and VC tissue engineered constructs. Conclusions: Tissue engineering of cardiovascular constructs by using UCA, UCV and UCC is feasible in an in vitro environment. Cell growth, morphology, characteristics and tissue formation were comparable between UCA, UCV, UCC and VC. UCC represent an attractive, readily available autologous cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering offering the additional benefits of utilizing juvenile cells and avoiding the invasive harvesting of intact vascular structures

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
77 citations in Web of Science®
93 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

22 downloads since deposited on 19 Oct 2018
10 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
Health Sciences > Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 April 2004
Deposited On:19 Oct 2018 07:21
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 14:51
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1010-7940
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejcts.2003.12.038

Download

Hybrid Open Access

Download PDF  'Human umbilical cord cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering: a comparative study'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 492kB
View at publisher