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Less invasive aortic valve surgery: rationale and technique


von Segesser, Ludwig K; Westaby, Stephen; Pomar, Jose; Loisance, Daniel; Groscurth, Peter; Turina, Marko (1999). Less invasive aortic valve surgery: rationale and technique. European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 15(6):781-785.

Abstract

The unquestionable aims for a less invasive operations are less morbidity, less discomfort, and a reduced hospital stay through an operation which proves equally durable to the conventional approach. Such an operation must be carried out without further risk to the patient or increased difficulty for the surgeon. Whilst most definitions of less invasive coronary surgery include the phrase without cardiopulmonary bypass, this is clearly not yet possible in valve surgery. In valve surgery, the definition of less invasive relates only to the size of incision and rate of recovery. As a result of the discussions during the Heart Lab International Workshop on video-assisted heart surgery in Zürich, October 22-25, 1998, the following conclusions emerged. The partial upper sternotomy with J- or L- shaped extension to the right is the preferred approach for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. Other methods which sacrify the internal thoracic arteries, open pleural cavities or predispose to long hernia are less satisfactory. A detailed description of the technique proposed is given and its indications and contraindications are discussed

Abstract

The unquestionable aims for a less invasive operations are less morbidity, less discomfort, and a reduced hospital stay through an operation which proves equally durable to the conventional approach. Such an operation must be carried out without further risk to the patient or increased difficulty for the surgeon. Whilst most definitions of less invasive coronary surgery include the phrase without cardiopulmonary bypass, this is clearly not yet possible in valve surgery. In valve surgery, the definition of less invasive relates only to the size of incision and rate of recovery. As a result of the discussions during the Heart Lab International Workshop on video-assisted heart surgery in Zürich, October 22-25, 1998, the following conclusions emerged. The partial upper sternotomy with J- or L- shaped extension to the right is the preferred approach for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. Other methods which sacrify the internal thoracic arteries, open pleural cavities or predispose to long hernia are less satisfactory. A detailed description of the technique proposed is given and its indications and contraindications are discussed

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
Health Sciences > Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 June 1999
Deposited On:25 Sep 2018 14:42
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:27
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1010-7940
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/s1010-7940(99)00119-0
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101016S1010794099001190 (Library Catalogue)

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