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Antecedent-consequent relations of perceived control to health and social support: longitudinal evidence for between-domain associations across adulthood


Gerstorf, D; Rocke, C; Lachman, M E (2011). Antecedent-consequent relations of perceived control to health and social support: longitudinal evidence for between-domain associations across adulthood. Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 66(1):61-71.

Abstract

Objectives. To examine antecedent-consequent relations of perceived control to health and social support across adulthood and old age. Methods. We applied (multigroup) change score models to two waves of data collected 9 years apart from 6,210 participants of the Midlife in the United States survey (MIDUS, 24-75 years at baseline). We used composite measures of perceived control (personal mastery and constraints), health (chronic conditions, acute conditions, and functional limitations), and social support (support and strain associated with spouse/partner, family, and friends). Results. Analyses revealed evidence for direct and independent multidirectional accounts. Greater initial control predicted weaker declines in health and stronger increases in support. In turn, increases in control were predicted by better initial health and more support. Changes in control were also accompanied by concurrent changes in the other two domains, and relations involving control were larger in size than those between health and support. We found only small sociodemographic differences across age, gender, and education group. Discussion. We conclude that perceiving control may serve as both a precursor and an outcome of health and social support across the adult age range and suggest routes for further inquiry

Abstract

Objectives. To examine antecedent-consequent relations of perceived control to health and social support across adulthood and old age. Methods. We applied (multigroup) change score models to two waves of data collected 9 years apart from 6,210 participants of the Midlife in the United States survey (MIDUS, 24-75 years at baseline). We used composite measures of perceived control (personal mastery and constraints), health (chronic conditions, acute conditions, and functional limitations), and social support (support and strain associated with spouse/partner, family, and friends). Results. Analyses revealed evidence for direct and independent multidirectional accounts. Greater initial control predicted weaker declines in health and stronger increases in support. In turn, increases in control were predicted by better initial health and more support. Changes in control were also accompanied by concurrent changes in the other two domains, and relations involving control were larger in size than those between health and support. We found only small sociodemographic differences across age, gender, and education group. Discussion. We conclude that perceiving control may serve as both a precursor and an outcome of health and social support across the adult age range and suggest routes for further inquiry

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 January 2011
Deposited On:16 Nov 2018 15:39
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:43
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1079-5014
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbq077
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101093geronbgbq077 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:21041231

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