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Prevalence of Enteric Pathogens among International Travelers with Diarrhea Acquired in Kenya (Mombasa), India (Goa), or Jamaica (Montego Bay)


Jiang, Zhi‐Dong; Lowe, Brett; Verenkar, M P; Ashley, David; Steffen, Robert; Tornieporth, Nadia; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Waiyaki, Peter; DuPont, Herbert L (2002). Prevalence of Enteric Pathogens among International Travelers with Diarrhea Acquired in Kenya (Mombasa), India (Goa), or Jamaica (Montego Bay). Journal of Infectious Diseases, 185(4):497-502.

Abstract

Stools from tourists from Europe and North America who acquired diarrhea in Mombasa (Kenya), Goa (India), or Montego Bay (Jamaica) were examined for enteric pathogens. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was the most common pathogen (25%) identified in the 3 locations. Isolation of Shigella species was more frequent in Goa and Mombasa than in Montego Bay (10%, 9%, and 0.3%, respectively; P < .005). Viruses (rotaviruses and enteric adenoviruses) were found in 9% of travelers to the 3 areas. Of 275 ETEC isolates in this study, 158 (57%) produced a defined colonization factor antigen (CFA). Coli surface 6 (CS6) was the most frequent and was found in 41%-52% of CFA/CS-positive ETEC isolates. The frequency of resistance among bacterial enteropathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents was particularly high throughout the study period in all 3 regions. Quinolones were active against the bacterial enteropathogens in the 3 sites

Abstract

Stools from tourists from Europe and North America who acquired diarrhea in Mombasa (Kenya), Goa (India), or Montego Bay (Jamaica) were examined for enteric pathogens. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was the most common pathogen (25%) identified in the 3 locations. Isolation of Shigella species was more frequent in Goa and Mombasa than in Montego Bay (10%, 9%, and 0.3%, respectively; P < .005). Viruses (rotaviruses and enteric adenoviruses) were found in 9% of travelers to the 3 areas. Of 275 ETEC isolates in this study, 158 (57%) produced a defined colonization factor antigen (CFA). Coli surface 6 (CS6) was the most frequent and was found in 41%-52% of CFA/CS-positive ETEC isolates. The frequency of resistance among bacterial enteropathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents was particularly high throughout the study period in all 3 regions. Quinolones were active against the bacterial enteropathogens in the 3 sites

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Immunology and Allergy
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Language:English
Date:15 February 2002
Deposited On:26 Sep 2018 12:26
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 14:51
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0022-1899
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/338834

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