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Power and coherence of sleep spindle frequency activity following hemispheric stroke


Gottselig, J M; Bassetti, C L; Achermann, P (2002). Power and coherence of sleep spindle frequency activity following hemispheric stroke. Brain : a journal of neurology, 125(2):373-383.

Abstract

Brainstem and thalamic structures are known to play a critical role in modulating sleep-wake cycles, but the extent to which the cerebral hemispheres are involved remains unclear. To study the role of the cerebral hemispheres in generating sleep EEG patterns, all‐night polysomnographic recordings were collected in subjects with brain damage (n=30) caused by hemispheric stroke and in hospitalized controls (n=12). Recordings were made in the acute (≤10days post‐stroke), subchronic (11-35days post‐stroke) and chronic (>60days post‐stroke) phases of stroke. Bipolar and referential EEG derivations were recorded. Standard sleep stage scoring was conducted using the referential derivation placed opposite the lesion. Sleep stage2 power and coherence spectra were calculated based on recordings from bipolar derivations. In the mean spectra, the highest spindle frequency peak was identified and its size was calculated relative to the background spectrum. Analysis of visually scored EEG data indicated that, compared with controls, acute phase brain‐damaged subjects had lower sleep efficiency and increased waking after sleep onset. The durations of rapid eye movement and non‐rapid eye movement sleep stages did not differ significantly between brain‐damaged subjects and hospitalized controls. Spectral analyses revealed that, compared with hospitalized controls, brain‐damaged subjects had significantly reduced spindle peak sizes in the power and coherence spectra from derivations ipsilateral to the lesion. Within‐subject comparisons across time demonstrated that the power and coherence of sleep spindle frequency activity increased significantly from the acute to the chronic phases of stroke, suggesting that plastic mechanisms allowed the possibility of recovery. Our findings provide novel evidence that the cerebral hemispheres are important in generating coherent sleep spindles in humans, and they are consonant with prior empirical and theoretical evidence that corticothalamic projections modulate the generation of synchronous spindle oscillations. Because spindle oscillations are thought to be involved in blocking sensory input to the cortex during sleep, the decrease in synchronous spindle frequency activity following hemispheric stroke may contribute to the observed reduction in sleep continuity

Abstract

Brainstem and thalamic structures are known to play a critical role in modulating sleep-wake cycles, but the extent to which the cerebral hemispheres are involved remains unclear. To study the role of the cerebral hemispheres in generating sleep EEG patterns, all‐night polysomnographic recordings were collected in subjects with brain damage (n=30) caused by hemispheric stroke and in hospitalized controls (n=12). Recordings were made in the acute (≤10days post‐stroke), subchronic (11-35days post‐stroke) and chronic (>60days post‐stroke) phases of stroke. Bipolar and referential EEG derivations were recorded. Standard sleep stage scoring was conducted using the referential derivation placed opposite the lesion. Sleep stage2 power and coherence spectra were calculated based on recordings from bipolar derivations. In the mean spectra, the highest spindle frequency peak was identified and its size was calculated relative to the background spectrum. Analysis of visually scored EEG data indicated that, compared with controls, acute phase brain‐damaged subjects had lower sleep efficiency and increased waking after sleep onset. The durations of rapid eye movement and non‐rapid eye movement sleep stages did not differ significantly between brain‐damaged subjects and hospitalized controls. Spectral analyses revealed that, compared with hospitalized controls, brain‐damaged subjects had significantly reduced spindle peak sizes in the power and coherence spectra from derivations ipsilateral to the lesion. Within‐subject comparisons across time demonstrated that the power and coherence of sleep spindle frequency activity increased significantly from the acute to the chronic phases of stroke, suggesting that plastic mechanisms allowed the possibility of recovery. Our findings provide novel evidence that the cerebral hemispheres are important in generating coherent sleep spindles in humans, and they are consonant with prior empirical and theoretical evidence that corticothalamic projections modulate the generation of synchronous spindle oscillations. Because spindle oscillations are thought to be involved in blocking sensory input to the cortex during sleep, the decrease in synchronous spindle frequency activity following hemispheric stroke may contribute to the observed reduction in sleep continuity

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2002
Deposited On:26 Sep 2018 12:36
Last Modified:04 Oct 2018 11:41
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0006-8950
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awf021
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicenceoxford101093brainawf021 (Library Catalogue)

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